Research Supporting All Aspects of MGOL

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To support my recent book, Mother Goose on the Loose, Updated (ALA Editions, 2019), I am in the process of compiling a list of all of the research and resources that I have used throughout the years. Together, these have supported the creation and continuing development of Mother Goose on the Loose (MGOL). In my new book, I chose to honor the original research upon which MGOL was built instead of replacing each citation with a newer one. (I did also include some new citations for the newer research mentioned.)

Because of that, on this website I have created an ongoing bibliography, ordered eclectically by topic, of countless resources that have influenced the development of Mother Goose on the Loose. It will be impossible to capture EVERYTHING, but at least this gives a good background.

 

Early Literacy

Armbruster, Bonnie, F. Lehr, and J. Osborn.  2003.  A Child Becomes a Reader: Birth Through Preschool.  Jessup, MD: The Partnership for Reading: Bringing Scientific Evidence to Learning.

Arnold, R. 2003. “Public Libraries and Early Literacy: Raising a Reader: ALA’s Preschool Literacy Initiative Educates Librarians on How to Play a Role in Teaching Reading to Children.” American Libraries 34, no. 8: 49-51.

Bennett-Armistead, V. Susan, Neil K. Duke, and Annie M. Moses. 2005. Literacy and the Youngest Learner. New York: Scholastic.

Birckmayer, Jennifer. 2000-2001. “The Role of Public Libraries in Emergent and Family Literacy.” Zero to Three (December/January): 24- 29.

Birckmayer, Jennifer, Anne Kennedy, & Anne Stonehouse. From Lullabies to Literature: Stories in the Lives of Infants and Toddlers. Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children, 2008.

Celano, Donna and Susan B. Neuman, The Role of Public Libraries in Children’s Literacy Development: An Evaluation Report (Harrisburg: Pennsylvania Library Association, 2001): 9.

Colburn, Nell and Maralita Freeny, eds. . First Steps to Literacy at: http://www.worldcat.org/title/first-steps-to-literacy-library-programs-for-parents-teachers-and-caregivers/oclc/607784055, ALA.

Dresang, Eliza T., Kathy Burnett, Janet Capps, and Erika N. Feldman. “The early literacy landscape for public libraries and their partners.” Unpublished whitepaper supported by Project VIEWS: Value Initiatives in Early Learning that Work Successfully. A National Leadership Collaborative Planning Grant, Institute for Museum and Library Services (2011), 12-13.

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, DHHS, Put Reading First: Helping Your Child Learn to Read (Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office, 2001).

Fields, M. V. & Spangler, K.L. (1995). Let’s begin reading right: Developmentally appropriate beginning literacy (3rd ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Merrill, Prentice Hall.

Ghoting, Saroj Nadkarni., and Pamela Martin-Díaz. 2006. Early Literacy Storytimes @ Your Library: Partnering With Caregivers for Success. Chicago: American Library Association.

International Reading Association. (1999). Beginning literacy and your child: A guide to helping your baby or preschooler become a reader. Newark, DE: Author.

International Reading Association and the National Association for the Education of Young Children. (1998). Learning to read and write: Developmentally appropriate practices for young children. Young Children, 53, 30-46.

Juel, Connie. “Learning to Read and Write: A Longitudinal Study of 54 Children from First through Fourth Grades,” Journal of Educational Psychology 80, no. 4 (1988): 437–47.

Katims, David S. 1994. “Emergence of Literacy in Preschool Children with Disabilities.” Learning Disability Quarterly 17, no. 1: 58-69.

Kuhl, Patricia K. “Brain Mechanisms in Early Language Acquisition.” Neuron 2010 September 9; 67(5): 713-727. doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2010.08.038.

Landry, Susan H., Paul R. Swank, Karen E. Smith, Michael A. Assel, and Susan B. Gunnewig. 2006. “Enhancing Early Literacy Skills for Preschool Children: Bringing a Professional Development Model to Scale.” J Learn Disabil 30, no. 4: 306-324.

Minkel, Walter. 2002. “It’s Never Too Early.” School Library Journal 48, No. 7 (July) 38-42.

Pretti-Frontczak, Kristie. “Stop Trying to Make Kids “Ready” for Kindergarten.” Young Exceptional Children March 2014 17: 51-53,doi:10.1177/1096250614523346

Public Library Association/Association of Library Service for Children Early Literacy Project – submitted by Sara Laughlin & Associates, Bloomington, Indiana, August 2003.

Public Library Association (PLA) and Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC), Every Child Ready to Read @ Your Library (Chicago: American Library Association, 2004).

PLA and ALSC, Every Child Ready to Read: Teaching Parents and Caregivers How to Support Early Literacy Development (Chicago: ALA Editions, 2011).

Schickedanz, Judith A. Much More Than ABCs: The Early Stages of Reading and Writing (Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children, 1999).

Selmi, A.M., R. Gallagher, & E.R. Mora-Flores. 2015. Early Childhood Curriculum for All Learners: Integrating Play and Literacy. Los Angeles: SAGE.

Serpell, R., Baker, L., & Sonnenschein, S. (2005). Becoming literate in the city: The
Baltimore Early Childhood Project. NY: Cambridge

Sonnenschein, Susan, Linda Baker, Robert Serpell, and Diane Schmidt. “Reading is a source of entertainment: The importance of the home perspective for children’s literacy development.” (2000).

Stoltz, D., Czarnecki, E.M., and Wilson, C.  2013. Every Child Ready for School. Chicago: ALA.

Teale, William. 2002. “Life and Literacy: Birth to Five.” Reported at the ALSC Leadership Institute in St. Louis, MO.

University of Washington ischool. “Valuable Initiative in Early Learning.” VIEWS2, UW Information School, 2017, views2.ischool.uw.edu/, accessed August 11, 2018. Dr. Eliza Dresang was the initiator and Principal Investigator of the VIEWS2 project.

Weigel, D.J., S.S. Martin, & K.K. Bennett. 2006. “Contributions of the Home Literacy Environment to Preschool-Aged Children’s Emerging Literacy and Language Skills.” Early Child Development and Care 176 (3-4): 357–78.

Vocabulary

Anderson, R. C., & Freebody, P. (1981). Vocabulary knowledge. In J. T. Guthrie (Ed.), Comprehension and Teaching: Research reviews (pp. 77–117). Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

Beck, I. L., McKeown, M. G., & Kucan, L. (2003). Taking delight in words: Using oral language to build young children’s vocabularies. American Educator, spring issue: Washington, DC: American Federation of Teachers.

Cabell SQ, Justice LM, McGinty AS, DeCoster J, Forston LD. Teacher-child conversations in preschool classrooms: Contributions to children’s vocabulary development. Early Childhood Research Quarterly. 2015; 300, Part A: 80-92. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2014.09.004

Cartmill, E. A., Armstrong, B. F., Gleitman, L. R., Goldin-Meadow, S., Medina, T. N., & Trueswell, J. C. (2013). Quality of early parent input predicts child vocabulary 3 years later. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 110(28), 11278-11283.ge

Demir, Ö. E., Rowe, M., Heller, G., Levine, S. C., & Goldin-Meadow, S. (2015). Developmental Psychology, 51, 161–175.

Elley, W. (1989). Vocabulary acquisition from listening to stories. Reading Research Quarterly, 24, 174-187. doi:10.2307/747863

Golinkoff, R.M., Can,  D.D., Soderstrom, M., and Hirsh-Pasek, K. (2015). I(Baby) Talk to Me: The Social Context of Infant-Directed Speech and Its Effects on Early Language Acquisition. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 24(5), 339-344. DOI: 10.1177/0963721415595345

Hoff, Erika. 2003. “The Specificity of Environmental Influence: socioeconomic Status Affects Early Vocabulary Development Via Maternal Speech.” Child Development 74, no. 5: 1368-1378.

Kachergis G., Yu C., Shiffrin RM. (2013). Actively learning object names across ambiguous situations. Topics in Cognitive Science, 5(1), 200-213. DOI: 10.1111/tops.12008

Kagan, S. L., E. Moore, and S. Bredekamp. “Reconsidering children’s early development and learning: Toward shared beliefs and vocabulary.” Washington, DC: National Education Goals Panel (1995).

Kit, Chunyu. 2003. “How Does a Lexical Acquisition Begin? A Cognitive Perspective.” Cognitive Science 1, no. 1: 1-50.

Hart, Betty and Todd R. Risley, Meaningful Differences in the Everyday Experience of Young American Children (Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes, 1995). Betty Hart and Todd Risley’s groundbreaking research made the first scientific connection between early language exposure and intellectual development. It also was a pioneer in documenting disparities in ultimate educational achievement levels between children from different economic backgrounds.

Marulis, L. M., & Neuman, S. B. (2010). The effects of vocabulary intervention on young
children’s word learning: A meta-analysis. Review of Educationa

Miller, Z. F., Fox, J. K., Moser, J. S., & Godfroid, A. (2018). Playing with fire: effects of negative mood induction and working memory on vocabulary acquisition. Cognition and Emotion, 32(5), 1105-1113.

Morgan, Paul L., George Farkas, Marianne M. Hillemeier, Carol Scheffner Hammer, and Steve Maczuga, “24-Month-Old Children with Larger Oral Vocabularies Display Greater Academic and Bahavioral Functioning at Kindergarten Entry,” Child Development 86, no. 5 (2015): 1351-1370.

Sonnenschein, S., Thompson, J.A., Metzger, S.R., & Baker, L. (2013). The importance
of teachers’ language and children’s vocabulary to early academic skills. NHSA
Dialog: A Research to Practice Journal for the Early Childhood Field, 16, 107-112.

Suskind, D., Suskind, B., & Lewinter-Suskind, L. 2015. Thirty Million Words: Building a Child’s Brain. New York: Dutton.

Wasik, B.A., & A.H. Hindman. 2015. “Talk Alone Won’t Close the 30-Million Word Gap.” Phi Delta Kappan 96 (6): 50–54.

Weisleder, A. & Fernald, A. 2013. “Talking to Children Matters: Early Language Experience Strengthens Processing and Builds Vocabulary.” Psychological Science 24 (11):2143- 2152.

Yu C, Ballard DH. A unified model of early word learning: integrating statistical and social cues. Neurocomputing.2007;70:2149–2165.

Print Awareness, Print Motivation, and Visual Literacy

Blake, Kate. “Learning to Look Across Disciplines: Visual Literacy for Museum Audiences.” Visual Literacy Today. Accessed August 11, 2018. https://visualliteracytoday.org/learning-to-look-across-disciplines-visual-literacy-for-museum-audiences-by-kate-blake/.

Coles, Robert. “How to Look at a Mountain,” interview by Milton Esterow, ARTnews 92, no. 3 (March 1993): 92–99.

Diamant-Cohen, Betsy, and Dorothy Valakos. “Promoting Visual Literacy Using the Mother Goose on the Loose Program.” Public Libraries 46, no. 2 (2007).

Edmonds, Ernest and Linda Candy. “ Creativity, Art Practice, and Knowledge”. Communications of the ACM. (2002): 91-95.

Epstein, A. S. 2001. “Thinking about Art: Encouraging Art Appreciation in Early Childhood Settings.” Young Children 56 (3): 38–43.

Frey, Nancy; Fisher, Douglas. Reading and the Brain: What Early Childhood Educators Need to Know. Early Childhood Education Journal, v38 n2 p103-110 Aug 2010.

Harris, Alyson. “Visual Supports for Students with Autism.” New Horizons for Learning 10, no. 2 (2012). http://education.jhu.edu/PD/newhorizons/Journals/specialedjournal/Harris.

Jalongo, Mary Renck. Young Children and Picture Books, 2nd ed. (Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children, 2004).

Lambert, Megan. 2010. “Gutter Talk and More: Picturebook Paratexts, Illustration, and Design at Storytime.” Children and Libraries 8, no. 3: 36-46.

Lukehart, Wendy. 2010. “Playgrounds for the Mind: Drawn to Delight: How Picturebooks Work (and Play) Today.” Children and Libraries 8, no. 3: 32-35.

National Research Council.  2001. Eager to Learn: Educating our Preschoolers. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Sharon Shaffer, Preschoolers and Museums: An Educational Guide (Washington, DC: Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center, n.d.).

Snow, Catherine E., M. Susan Burns, and Peg Griffin, eds., Preventing Reading Difficulties in Young Children (Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 1998): 9–10.

Phonological Awareness

Klanderman, N. Z. (1979). The development of auditory discrimination and performance of pitch, rhythm, and melody in preschool children. (Doctoral dissertation, Northwestern University, 1979). Dissertation Abstracts International, 40, 3177-A.

Pullen, Paige C., and Laura M. Justice. 2003. “Enhancing Phonological Awareness, Print Awareness, and Oral Language Skills in Preschool Children.” Intervention in School and Clinic 39, no. 2: 87-98.

Ruan, Y., Georgiou, G. K., Song, S., Li, Y., & Shu, H. (2018). Does writing system influence the associations between phonological awareness, morphological awareness, and reading? A meta-analysis. Journal of Educational Psychology, 110(2), 180.

Narrative Skills/ Comprehension

Applebee, Arthur N. 1989. The Child’s Concept of Story: Ages Two to Seventeen. Chicago, IL: University Of Chicago.

Emery, D.W. 1996. “Helping Readers Comprehend Stories from the Characters’ Perspectives.” The Reading Teacher 49, 534-541.

Fox, Carol. 1993. At the Very Edge of the Forest: the Influence of Literature on Storytelling by Children. London: Cassell. http://catalog.hathitrust.org/api/volumes/oclc/29635985.html.

Gurdon, Meghan Fox. (2019). The Secret Power of the Children’s Picture Book – Even infants get profound cognitive and behavioral benefits from sharing a vivid story. The Wall Street Journal 19 Jan 2019: C.3.

Paris, A.H., & Paris, S.G. (2003). Assessing narrative comprehension in young children. Reading Research Quarterly, 38, 36-76. doi:10.1598/RRQ.38.1.3

Pellegrini, A.D., & Galda, L. (1982). The effects of thematic-fantasy play training on the development of children’s story comprehension. American Educational Research Journal, 19, 443-452. doi:10.2307/11627

Zimmermann, Susan, and Chryse Hutchins. 7 keys to comprehension: how to help your kids read it and get it!. New York: Three Rivers Press, 2003.

Oral Language

Dickinson, D. K., Golinkoff, R. M., & Hirsh-Pasek, K. (2010). Speaking out for language: Why language is central to reading development. Educational Researcher, 39, 305–310. doi:10.3102/0013189X10370204

Engel, Susan. (1997) “Storytelling in the First Three Years.” Edited from the Zero to Three http://www.zerotothree.org/child-development/early-language-literacy/the-emergence-of-storytelling.html

Fox, Mem. 2001. Reading Magic: Why Reading Aloud to our Children Will Change Their Lives Forever. New York: Harcourt.

Gros‐Louis, J., West, M. J., & King, A. P. (2014). Maternal responsiveness and the development of directed vocalizing in social interactions. Infancy, 19(4), 385-408.

Gros-Louis, J., West, M. J., & King, A. P. (2016). The influence of interactive context on prelinguistic vocalizations and maternal responses. Language Learning and Development, 12(3), 280-294.

Hirsh-Pasek, K., Adamson, L., Bakeman, R., Golinkoff, R.M., Pace, A., Yust, P. & Suma, K. (2015). The contribution of early communication to low-income children’s language success. Psychological Science. 26, 1071-1083.

Hirsh-Pasek, Kathy and Roberta Michnick Golinkoff. “How and how much we talk to children matters.” The Dallas Morning News, Published: 12 June 2015 04:52 PM. http://www.dallasnews.com/opinion/latest-columns/20150612-kathy-hirsh-pasek-and-roberta-michnick-golinkoff-how-and-how-much-we-talk-to-children-matters.ece

Leong, D.J. & Bodrova, E. “Building Language and Literacy Through Play.” https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/articles/teaching-content/building-language-literacy-through-play/

National Center for Educational Statistics, “Public School Kindergarten Teachers’ Views on Children’s Readiness for School,” Kindergarten Teacher Survey on School Readiness (Washington, DC: NCES, 1993), http://nces.ed.gov/quicktables/displaytableimage.asp?ID=QTFImage1280/, accessed July 27, 2017.

Snow, Pamela, and Martine Powell. Youth (in)justice: Oral language competence in early life and risk for engagement in antisocial behavior in adolescence. Trends & Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice No. 435 (April 2012), Australian Institute of Criminology, Criminology Research Council.

Talbot, Margaret. 2015. “The Talking Cure” The New Yorker Jan 12, 2015, http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/01/12/talking-cure

Every Child Ready to Read

ALSC and PLA, Every Child Ready to Read, 2nd Edition Kit (Chicago, IL: ALSC and PLA, 2011)

Association for Library Service to Children, and Public Library Association. Every Child Ready to Read @ Your Library. Chicago: ALSC/PLA, 2011.

Association for Library Services to Children and Public Library Association. 2011, May 4. Every Child Ready to Read Sneak Peek Webinar. Retrieved from http://www.everychildreadytoread.org/sneak-peek-webinar.

Leitão, Suze. “Talk to Your Baby!” Early Intervention 9: 1, 2007, p.21.

Neuman, S. B., N. Noland, & D. Celano. 2017. Bringing Literacy Home: An Evaluation of the Every Child Ready to Read Program. Chicago: ALA. http://everychildreadytoread.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/2017-ECRR-Report-Final.pdf

Neuman Susan and Donna Celano. 2010. An Evaluation of Every Child Ready to Read: A Parent Initiative.

School Readiness

Ackerman, D. J., and Barnett, W. S. (2005). Prepared for kindergarten: What does “readiness” mean? New Brunswick, NJ: National Institute for Early Education Research. Available at http://nieer.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/report5.pdf

Blair, Clancy.  2002.  “School readiness: Integrating cognition and emotion in a neurobiological conceptualization of children’s functioning at school entry.”  American Psychologist 57, No. 2 (February): 111-127.

Blair, Clancy, and Rachel Peters Razza. 2007. “Relating Effortful Control, Executive Function, and False Belief Understanding to Emerging Math and Literacy Ability in Kindergarten.” Child Development 78, no. 2: 647-663.

Brown, E., Benedett, B, & Armistead, M.E., (2010). Arts enrichment and school readiness for children at risk. Early Childhood Research Quarterly 25 (1), 112-124.

Daily, S., Burkhauser, M., & Halle, T. (2010). A review of school readiness practices in the states: Early learning guidelines and assessments. Child Trends Early Childhood Highlights series. Retrieved from www.childtrends.org/wpcontent/uploads/2013/02/Child_Trends-2010_06_18_ECH_SchoolReadiness.pdf

DeBaryshe, B.D., S. Yuen, and M.N. Ripke. School Readiness in Hawai’i. (Honululu: University of Hawai’I, 2008).

Diamond, Adele. “The Evidence Base for Improving School Outcomes by Addressing the Whole Child and by Addressing Skills and Attitudes, Not Just Content,” Early Education and Development 21, no. 2 (2010): 780–93

Duncan, G. J., & Magnuson, K. (2011). The nature and impact of early achievement
skills, attention skills, and behavior problems. In G.J. Duncan, & R.J. Murnane
(Eds.), Whither opportunity? Rising inequality, schools, and children’s life
chances (pp.47-70). NY: Russell Sage Foundation

Duncan, G. J., Dowsett, C. J., Claessens, A., Magnuson, K., Huston, A. C., Klebanov, P., & Japel, C. (2007). School readiness and later achievement. Developmental Psychology, 43, 1428–1446. doi:10.1037/0012-1649.43.6.1428

Hair, E., Halle, T., Terry-Humen, E., Lavelle, B., and Calkins, J. (2006). Children’s school readiness in the ECLS-K: Predictions to academic, health, and social outcomes in first grade. Early Childhood Research Quarterly , 21(4), 431-454. Available at: http://www.childtrends.org/Files//Child_Trends-2006_09_12_OP_ECLSKReadiness.pdf

Halle, T., Zaslow., M., Zaff, J., Calkins, J., & Margie, N. 2000. “School Readiness: Helping Communities Get Children Ready for School and Schools Ready for Children.” Child Trends: Research Brief October 2001, Washington. This Research Brief is based on the executive summary of a longer Child Trends’ report, Background for Community-Level Work on School Readiness: A Review of Definitions, Assessments, and Investment Strategies by the above authors prepared for the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

Hirsh-Pasek, K. & Michnick Golinkoff, R. & Berk, L. E. & Singer, D.g. A Mandate for Playful Learning in Preschool. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009

Kagan, Sharon L., Evelyn Moore, and Sue Bredekamp, eds., Reconsidering Children’s Early Development and Learning: Toward Common Views and Vocabulary, report of the National Education Goals Panel, Goal 1 Technical Planning Group (Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1995).

Maryland State Department of Education. Children Entering School Ready to Learn: School Readiness Baseline Information. Baltimore, MD: Maryland State Department of Education, 2002.

Maryland State Department of Education. 2009. “Maryland Model for School Readiness (MMSR): Framework and Standards for Prekindergarten.” 6th ed. Revised Summer. Maryland State Department of Education.

Maryland State Department of Education/Ready at Five. 2013. The 2012-2013 Maryland School Readiness Report: Children Entering School Ready To Learn. Baltimore: MD.

Maryland State Department of Education. Maryland Early Learning Standards: Birth – 8 Years (Baltimore, MD: MSDE: Office of Early Childhood Development, 2016): 40, 135, 145, 150, 159. https://earlychildhood.marylandpublicschools.org/system/files/filedepot/4/msde-pedagogy-report-_appendix_2016.pdf, accessed August 11, 2018.

National Center for Educational Statistics. 1993. “Public School Kindergarten Teachers’ Views on Children’s Readiness for School.” Kindergarten Teacher Survey on School Readiness. Available: nces.ed.gov/quicktables/displaytableimage.asp?ID=QTFImage1280

National Education Goals Panel. (1997). Special early childhood report, 1997 . Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. p. 3. Available at: http://govinfo.library.unt.edu/negp/reports/spcl.pdf

National Reading Panel. April 2000. Teaching Children to Read: An Evidence-Based Assessment of the Scientific Research Literature on Reading and Its Implications for Reading Instruction. http://www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/nrp/smallbook.htm Last accessed July 1, 2006.

National Research Council. 1999. Starting Out Right: A Guide to Promoting Children’s Reading Success. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

National Research Council.  2001. Eager to Learn: Educating our Preschoolers. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

National School Readiness Indicators Initiative. (2005). Findings from the 17 State School Readiness Initiative: A 17 State Partnership. Available at: © Copyright 2014 Child Trends – All Rights Reserved 15 http://www.gettingready.org

Neuman, S.B., & K. Roskos. 2007. Nurturing Knowledge: Building a Foundation for School Success by Linking Early Literacy to Math, Science, Art, and Social Studies. New York: Scholastic.

New Jersey: Center for Family Services. School Readiness Goals (Camden, New Jersey: Center for Family Services, 2017). https://www.centerffs.org/headstart/school-readiness-goals, accessed August 11, 2018.

Office of Humanities and Early Childhood, Virginia Department of Education. (2013). Virginia’s Foundation Blocks for Early Learning: Comprehensive Standards for Four-Year-Olds. http://www.doe.virginia.gov/instruction/early_childhood/preschool_initiative/foundation-blocks.pdf

Passe, Angèle Sancho. Is Everybody Ready for Kindergarten? A Tool Kit for Preparing Children and Families. St. Paul, MN: Redleaf Press: 2010

Ramey, C. T., & Ramey, S. L. (2004). Early learning and school readiness: Can early intervention make a difference? Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, 50, 471–491.

Rouse, C., Brooks-Gunn, J., and McLanahan, S. (2005). School readiness: Closing racial and ethnic gaps: Introducing the issue. Future of Children, 15(1). Available at: http://www.princeton.edu/futureofchildren/publications/docs/15_01_FullJournal.pdf

Stoltz, Dorothy, Elaine Czarnecki and Connie Wilson. Every Child Ready for School (ALA Editions, 2013).

U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. 1995. “Kindergarten Teacher Survey on Student Readiness” in Digestof Education Statistics Tables and Figures. (This table was prepared in April 2004)

Vandivere, S., Pitzer, L., Halle, T., & Hair, E. (2004). Indicators of early school success and child well-being. Published in Ready Schools Reference Guide. W. K. Kellogg Foundation. Available at: http://www.wkkf.org/default.aspx? tabid=101&CID=3&CatID=3&ItemID=5000284&NID=20&LanguageID=0

 

Social and Emotional Well-being

Beckoff, Marc. 2001. Social Play Behavior: cooperation, Fairness, Trust, and the Evolution of Morality. Journal of Consciousness Studies 8, No. 2: 81-90.

Berger, A., Self-Regulation: Brain, cognition, and development. 2011, Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Bigelow, Ann E. 2001. “Discovering Self Through Others: Infants’ Preference for Social Contingency.” Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic 65, No.3: 335-346.

Blair, Clancy. 2003. “Self-Regulation and School Readiness.” Eric Digest (July)

Blair, Clancy. 2002. “School readiness: Integrating cognition and emotion in a neurobiological conceptualization of children’s functioning at school entry.” American Psychologist 57, No. 2 (February): 111-127.

Blair, Clancy, and Adele Diamond. 2002. “Biological Processes in Prevention and Intervention: The Promotion of Self-Regulation as a Means of Preventing School Failure.” Development and Psychopathology 20, no. 3: 899-911.

Blair, Clancy, and Rachel Peters Razza. 2007. “Relating Effortful Control, Executive Function, and False Belief Understanding to Emerging Math and Literacy Ability in Kindergarten.” Child Development 78, no. 2: 647-663.

Carlson, S.M., Social origins of executive function development. New directions for child and adolescent development, 2009. 2009(123): p. 87-98. Between two and three years of age, children demonstrate the ability to delay gratification in laboratory activities such as those where they are asked not to peek during a gift-delay task.

Diamond, A., 2013. Executive functions. Annual review of psychology, 64, p.135.

Duckworth, Angela Lee. Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance. Scribner, 2016.

Durlak, J. A., Weissberg, R. P., Dymnicki, A. B., Taylor, R. D. & Schellinger, K. B. (2011). The impact of enhancing students’ social and emotional learning: A meta-analysis of school-based universal interventions. Child Development, 82(1): 405–432.

Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center. 2018. Child social-emotional competence checklist. (Interaction checklist 3 of 4) http://ectacenter.org/~pdfs/decrp/INT-3_Child_Soc-Emot_Competence_2018.pdf

Families and Work Institute, IMLS, and School Readiness Consulting, Brain-Building Powerhouses: How Museums and Libraries Can Strengthen Executive Function Life Skills in the Making, Families and Work Institute, and Institute of Museum and Library Services, 2015),  http:// mindinthemaking.org/download/museums-and-libraries.pdf.

Fox, Lisa and Rochelle Harper Lentini. 2006. You Got It!” Teaching Social and Emotional Skills. Young Children November 2006, 1-7. http://challengingbehavior.cbcs.usf.edu/docs/YouGotIt_Teaching-Social-Emotional-Skills.pdf

Galinsky, Ellen. 2010. Mind in the Making: The Seven Essential Life Skills Every Child Needs. New York: HarperStudio.

Galinsky, Ellen, & Nicole Gardner. 2016. Skill 3: Communicating. Teaching Young Children 9(5): 28-30.

Garon, Nancy, Susan E. Bryson, and Isabel M. Smith. 2008. “Executive function in preschoolers: a review using an integrative framework.” Psychological bulletin 134, no. 1 (2008): 31.

Goleman, Daniel, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ (New York: Bantam, 1995).

Goleman, Daniel. 2006. Social Intelligence: The New Science of Human Relationships. New York: Bantam.

Goleman, Daniel. 2009. Ecological Intelligence: How Knowing the Hidden Impacts of What We Buy Can Change Everything. New York: Broadway Books.

Gross, J.J., Emotion regulation: Affective, cognitive, and social consequences. Psychophysiology, 2002. 39: p. 281-291.

Jalongo, Mary Renck. 2008. Learning to Listen, Listening to Learn. Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children

Jones, D. E., Greenberg, M.& Crowley, M. (2015). Early Social-Emotional Functioning and Public Health: The Relationship Between Kindergarten Social Competence and Future Wellness. American Journal of Public Health. e-View Ahead of Print. 105(11), 2283-2290. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2015.302630

Joseph, E., P. S. Strain, and the Center on Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning, Enhancing Emotional Vocabulary in Young Children (Champaign: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2003).

Landy, S. 2002. Pathways to Competence: Encouraging Healthy Social and Emotional Development in Young Children. Baltimore: Brookes.

Lynch, Thomas R., Roelie J. Hempel, and Christine Dunkley. “Radically Open – Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Disorders of Over-Control: Signaling Matters,” American Journal of Psychotherapy 69, no. 2 (2015): 141-162.

Meltzer, Lynn. Promoting Executive Function in the Classroom. Guilford Press, 2010.

Mendelsohn, Alan L., et al. “Reading aloud, play, and social-emotional development.” Pediatrics 141.5 (2018): e20173393.

Mischel, W., et al., ‘Willpower over the life span: decomposing self-regulation. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 2011.

Miyake, Akira, N. Friedman, M.J. Emerson, A.H. Witzki, A. Howerter. The Unity and Diversity of Executive Functions and their contributions to Complex “Frontal Lobe” Tasks: A Latent Variable Analysis. Cognitive Psycology 41, 49-100, 200.

Morgan P.L., et al. 2018. “Executive Function Deficits in Kindergarten Predict Repeated Academic Difficulties Across Elementary School.” Early Childhood Research Quarterly (in press) https://www.researchgate.net/deref/https%3A%2F%2Fdoi.org%2F10.1016%2Fj.ecresq.2018.06.009

National Scientific Council of the Developing Child. Children’s Emotional Development is Built Into the Architecture of Their Brains. (Working Paper #2). Waltham, MA: Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University.

Office of Head Start, Head Start Early Learning Outcomes Framework: Ages Birth to Five (Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2015): 28-30, 32-33. https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/pdf/elof-ohs-framework.pdf, accessed August 11, 2018

Pace, Amy, Rebecca Alper, Margaret R. Burchinal, Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, and Kathy Hirsh-Pasek. “Measuring Success: Within and Cross-Domain Predictors of Academic and Social Trajectories in Elementary School,” Early Childhood Research Quarterly (2018). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2018.04.001.

Posner, M. and M. Rothbart, Research on attention networks as a model for the integration of psychological science. Annu. Rev. Psychol, 2007. 58: p. 1-23

Raver, C.C. and Jane Knitzer, 2002, Ready to Enter: What Research Tells Policymakers About Strategies to Promote Social and Emotional School Readiness Among Three- and Four-Year-Old Children, Columbia University Academic Commons, http://hdl.handle.net/10022/AC:P:9263.

Raver, C.C. and E. F. Zigler. 1997. “Social Competence: An Untapped Dimension in Evaluating Head Start’s Success.” Early Childhood Research Quarterly 12: 363-385.

Regional Educational Laboratory Program. 2017. “A review of the literature on social and emotional learning for students ages 3-8: Characteristics of effective social and emotional learning programs. https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/projects/project.asp?projectID=443

Rohlf, Helena L., Anna K. Holl, Fabian Kirsch, Barbara Krahé, and Birgit Elsner. “Longitudinal Links between Executive Function, Anger, and Aggression in Middle Childhood,” Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience 12, no. 27 (2018): 12.

Strain, Phillip S., and Ronald Wiegerink. 1976. “The Effects of Sociodramatic Activities on Social Interaction Among Behaviorally Disordered Preschool Children.” Journal of Special Education 10, no. 1: 71-5.

Uribarri, Adrian. 2013. “The Missing Piece: A National Teacher Survey on How Social and Emotional Learning Can Empower Children and Transform Schools.” CASEL Guide Online. http://www.casel.org/library/the-missing-piece

Webster-Stratton, Carolyn PhD; Reid, M Jamila PhD. (2004) Strengthening Social and Emotional Competence in Young Children—The Foundation for Early School Readiness and Success: Incredible Years Classroom Social Skills and Problem‐Solving Curriculum. Infants & Young Children: April/May/June 2004 – Volume 17 – Issue 2 – p 96–113.

Zero to Three: Early Experiences Matter. “Development of Social-Emotional Skills.”
http://www.zerotothree.org/child-development/social-emotional-development/social-emotional-development.html

Self-Regulation / Executive Function

Aamodt, S., & Wang, S.  Welcome to Your Brain: Why You Lose Your Car Keys But Never Forget How to Drive and Other Puzzles of Everyday Behavior. Bloomsbury Publishing USA. 2009, p. 6.

Ang, S. Y., Lee, K., Cheam, F., Poon, K., & Koh, J. (2015). Updating and working memory training: Immediate improvement, long-term maintenance, and generalizability to non-trained tasks. Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, 4, 121–128. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.  jarmac.2015.03.001

Barker, Lynne, and Nick Morton. “Executive function (s): Conductor, Orchestra or Symphony? Towards a Trans-Disciplinary Unification of Theory and Practice Across Development, in Normal and Atypical Groups.” (2018).

Berger, A., Self-Regulation: Brain, cognition, and development. 2011, Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Bernier A, Carlson SM, Whipple N. From external regulation to self-regulation: Early parenting precursors of young children’s executive functioning. Child Development. 2010; 81:326–339.

Best, J. R., Miller, P. H., & Naglieri, J. A. (2011). Relations between executive function and academic achievement from ages 5 to 17 in a large, representative national sample. Learning and Individual Differences, 21(4), 327–336. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lindif.2011.01.007

Bierman, K. L., Nix, R. L., Greenberg, M. T., Blair, C. B., & Domitrovich, C. E. (2008). Executive
functions and school readiness intervention: Impact, moderation, and mediation in the Head Start REDI program. Development and Psychopathology, 20(03), 821–843. https://doi.
org/10.1017/S0954579408000394

Blair, Clancy, and Adele Diamond. 2002. “Biological Processes in Prevention and Intervention: The Promotion of Self-Regulation as a Means of Preventing School Failure.” Development and Psychopathology 20, no. 3: 899-911.

Blair, C. B., Ursache, A., Greenberg, M. T., Vernon-Feagans, L., & The Family Life Project
Investigators. (2015). Multiple aspects of self-regulation uniquely predict mathematics but
not letter–word knowledge in the early elementary grades. Developmental Psychology, 51(4), 459–472. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0038813

Bodrova, E., & D. J. Leong. 2006. Tools of the Mind: The Vygotskian Approach to Early Childhood Education. 2nd ed. New York, Pearson.

Campos, J.J. and C.R. Stenberg, Perception, appraisal and emotion: The onset of social referencing, in Infant social cognition, M.E. Lamb and L.R. Sherrod, Editors. 1981, Erlbaum: Hillsdale, NJ. p. 273-310.

Carlson, S.M., Social origins of executive function development. New directions for child and adolescent development, 2009. 2009(123): p. 87-98.

Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University (2011). Building the Brain’s “Air Traffic Control” System: How Early Experiences Shape the Development of Executive Function: Working Paper No. 11. Retrieved from www.developingchild.harvard.edu

Chang, Yu-Kai, Yu-Jung Tsai, Tai-Ting Chen, and Tsung-Min Hung. “The impacts of coordinative exercise on executive function in kindergarten children: an ERP study.” Experimental Brain Research 225, no. 2 (2013): 187-196.

Clements, D.H., and Sarama, J. “Executive Function and Early Mathematical Learning Difficulties” in A. Fritz (et.al. (eds.) International Handbook of Mathematical Learning, Springer, 2019: 755-771.

Cooper, G, Hoffman, K, Marvin, R & Powell, B 2000, Circle of repair, Circle of Security International, Spokane WA, available at [http://circleofsecurity.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/COS_chart-circleofrepair. pdf], accessed September 2012.

Dawson, Peg, and Richard Guare. Smart but scattered: The revolutionary” executive skills” approach to helping kids reach their potential. Guilford Press, 2009.

Dawson, P., & Guare, R. (2009). Executive skills: The hidden curriculum. Principal Leadership, 9(7), 10-14.

Diamant-Cohen, B, and M Hetrick. Transforming Preschool Storytime.

Fisher, A. V., Godwin, K. E., & Seltman, H. (2014). Visual environment, attention allocation,
and learning in young children: When too much of a good thing may be bad. Psychological
Science. https://doi.org/10.1177/0956797614533801

Galinsky, Ellen. Mind in the Making: The Seven Essential Life Skills Every Child Needs. HarperStudio, 2010.

Gross, J.J., Emotion regulation: Affective, cognitive, and social consequences. Psychophysiology, 2002. 39: p. 281-291.

Harvey, H. A., & Miller, G. E. (2016). Executive function skills, early mathematics, and vocabulary in head start preschool children. Early Education and Development, 1–18. https://doi.org/10.1080/10409289.2016.1218728

Hazy, Thomas E., Michael J. Frank, and Randall C. O’Reilly. “Towards an executive without a homunculus: computational models of the prefrontal cortex/basal ganglia system.” Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 362.1485 (2007): 1601-1613.

Kochanska G, Coy KC and Murray KT (2001) The development of self-regulation in the first four years of life. Child Development 72: 1091–1111.

Koo, M., & Fishbach, A. (2008). Dynamics of self-regulation: How (un)accomplished goal actions affect motivation. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 94, 183–195.

LeFevre, J.-A., Berrigan, L., Vendetti, C., Kamawar, D., Bisanz, J., Skwarchuk, S.-L., & Smith- Chant, B. L. (2013). The role of executive attention in the acquisition of mathematical skills for children in grades 2 through 4. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 114(2), 243–261.

Lehrer, Jonah. “Don’t!.” The secret of self-control. The New Yorker 18 (2009).

Linder, Toni. Read, Play, and Learn!

Miller, M. R., Rittle-Johnson, B., Loehr, A. M., & Fyfe, E. R. (2016). The influence of relational
knowledge and executive function on preschoolers’ repeating pattern knowledge. Journal of Cognition and Development, 17(1), 85–104.  https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2015.1023307

Mischel, W., et al., ‘Willpower the life span: decomposing self-regulation. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 2011. 6(2): p. 252-256.

Mischel, Walter. The marshmallow test: mastering self-control. Little, Brown & Co., 2014.

Mischel, Walter, Ebbe B. Ebbesen, and Antonette Raskoff Zeiss. “Cognitive and attentional mechanisms in delay of gratification.” Journal of personality and social psychology 21, no. 2 (1972): 204.

Morgan, P.L., Farkas, G., Wang, Y., Hillemeier, M.M., Oh, Y., & Maczuga (2019).
Executive function deficits in kindergarten predict repeated academic difficulties
across elementary school. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 46, 20-32.

Nesbitt, K. T., Farran, D. C., & Fuhs, M. W. (2015). Executive function skills and academic achievement gains in prekindergarten: Contributions of learning-related behaviors. Developmental Psychology. https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0000021

Neuenschwander, R., Röthlisberger, M., Cimeli, P., & Roebers, C. M. (2012). How do different
aspects of self-regulation predict successful adaptation to school. Journal of Experimental
Child Psychology, 113(3), 353–371. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2012.07.004

Otero, T. M., Barker, L. A., & Naglieri, J. A. (2014). Executive function treatment and intervention in schools. Applied Neuropsychology: Child, 3(3), 205–214. https://doi.org/10.1080/2162296 5.2014.897903

Posner, M. and M. Rothbart, Research on attention networks as a model for the integration of psychological science. Annu. Rev. Psychol, 2007. 58: p. 1-23.

Raver, C.C., et al., Predicting individual differences in low-income children’s executive control from early to middle childhood. Developmental Science, 2013. 16(3): p. 394-408.

Raver, C. C., Jones, S. M., Li-Grining, C., Zhai, F., Bub, K., & Pressler, E. (2011). CRSP’s impact
on low-income preschoolers’ preacademic skills: Self-regulation as a mediating  mechanism. Child Development, 82(1), 362–378. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01561.x

Razza, R. P., & Raymond, K. (2015). Executive functions and school readiness. In S. Robson & S. F. Quinn (Eds.), The Routledge international handbook of young children’s thinking and understanding (pp. 133–149). New York: Routledge.

Ruff, H. and M. Rothbart, Attention in Early Development: Themes and Variations. 1996, London: Oxford University Press.

Seigel, D 1999, The developing mind: Toward a neurobiology of interpersonal experience, Guilford Press, New York.

Shoda, Yuichi, Walter Mischel, and Philip K. Peake. “Predicting adolescent cognitive and self-regulatory competencies from preschool delay of gratification: Identifying diagnostic conditions.” Developmental psychology26, no. 6 (1990): 978.

Swami, S. (2013). Executive functions and decision making: A managerial review. IIMB Management Review, 25(4), 203-212.

Tominey, S. L., & McClelland, M. M. (2011). Red light, purple light: Findings from a randomized trial using circle time games to improve behavioral self-regulation in preschool. Early Education and Development, 22(3), 489–519. https://doi.org/10.1080/10409289.2011.574258

Weiland, C., Barata, M. C., & Yoshikawa, H. (2014). The co-occurring development of executive function skills and receptive vocabulary in preschool- aged children: A look at the direction of the developmental pathways. Infant and Child Development, 23, 4–21. https://doi.org/10.1002/icd.1829

Zelazo, P. D., Müller, U., Frye, D., Marcovitch, S., Argitis, G., Boseovski, J., et al. (2003). The development of executive function in early childhood. Monogr Soc Res Child Dev, 68(3), i-151.

Zeytinoglu, S., Calkins, S. D., & Leerkes, E. M. (2019). Maternal emotional support but not cognitive support during problem-solving predicts increases in cognitive flexibility in early childhood. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 43(1), 12-23.

Health and Physical Well-being

Clift, S., Hancox, G., Staricoff, R., and Whitmore, C (2008) Singing and Health: A Systematic Mapping and review of Non-Clinical Research. Canterbury Christ Church University [online] . [Accessed 156 Oct 2011]. Available from: http://www.canterbury.ac.uk/Research/Centres/SDHR/Documents/SingingandHealthFullReport.pdf

Forencich, Frank. 2006. Exuberant Animal: The Power of Health, Play, and Joyful Movement. Bloomington, IN: AuthorHouse.

Fredrickson, B. L. 2000.” Cultivating positive emotions to optimize health and well-being.” Prevention and Treatment, 3, Article 1. Available journals.apa.org/prevention/volume3/pre0030001a.html.

Fredrickson, B. 1998. “What Good are Positive Emotions?” Review of General Psychology 2: 300–319.

Frederickson, B. (2001). “The role of positive emotions in positive psychology: The broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions.” American Psychologist, 56, 218-226.

Ginsburg, Kenneth. “The Importance of Play in Promoting Healthy Child Development and Maintaining Strong Parent-Child Bonds”. Pediatrics. (2007) 119(1): 182-191.

Greenspan, Stanley. (1999) Building Healthy Minds: The Six Experiences that Create Intelligence and Emotional Growth in Babies and Young Children. Perseus Books.

Jones, D. E., Greenberg, M.& Crowley, M. (2015). Early Social-Emotional Functioning and Public Health: The Relationship Between Kindergarten Social Competence and Future Wellness. American Journal of Public Health. e-View Ahead of Print. 105(11), 2283-2290. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2015.302630

Kirk, S.M., C.R. Vizcarra, E.C. Looney, & E.P. Kirk. 2014. “Using Physical Activity to Teach Academic Content: A Study of the Effects on Literacy in Head Start Preschoolers.” Early Childhood Education Journal 42 (3): 181–89.

Kirk, S.M., W. Fuchs, & E.P. Kirk. 2013. “Improving Preschool Literacy Skills using Physical Activity.” Research to Practice Summary. Dialog 16 (3): 155–59. https://journals.uncc.edu/dialog/article/viewFile/66/178.

Stacy, R., Brittain, K., & Kerr, S. (2002). Singing for health: an exploration of the issues. Health Education, 102(4), 156-162.

Approaches to Learning

Burns, Martha. 2004. “Care and Feeding of the Brain: How to Prepare a Child To Be a Good Reader. Brain Connection. Available: www.brainconnection.com/topics/?main=col/burns00mar Last accessed 17 July 2004.

Bus, Adriana G., Jay Belsky, Marinus H. van Ijzendoom, and Keith Crnic, “Attachment and Bookreading Patterns: A Study of Mothers, Fathers, and their Toddlers,” Early Childhood Research Quarterly 12, no. 1 (1997): 81–98

Codell, Esmé Raji. 2003. How to Get Your Child to Love Reading. Chapel Hill, NC: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill.

Digitale-Stanford, El. 2018. “Good Attitude About Math Gets Kids Brains in High Gear.” www.futurity.org/positive-attitude-math-brains-1665192.

Helm, Judy Harris, Stacy M. Berg, and Pamela Scranton. 2004. Teaching your child to love learning: a guide to doing projects at home. New York: Teachers College Press.

Hyson, Marilou. Enthusiastic and Engaged Learners: Approaches to Learning in the Early Childhood Classroom. New York: Teachers College Press, 2008.

Institute of Museum and Library Services. 2013. Growing Young Minds. Washington: IMLS.

Vitiello, V. E., Greenfield, D. B., Munis, P., & George, J. L. (2011). Cognitive flexibility, approaches to learning, and academic school readiness in head start preschool children. Early Education and Development, 22(3), 388–410. https://doi.org/10.1080/10409289.2011.538366

Language Development

Braunger, Jane and Jan P. Lewis, Building a Knowledge Base in Reading, 2nd ed. (Portland: Northwest Regional Laboratory, 1998).

Cass-Beggs, Barbara. Your Child Needs Music (Mississauga, Ontario: Frederick Harris Muric co., 1986), 25

Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick, Dilara Deniz Can, Melanie Soderstrom, and Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, “(Baby) Talk to Me: The Social Context of Infant-Directed Speech and Its Effects on Early Language Acquisition,” Current Directions in Psychological Science 24, no. 5 (2015): 339–44.

Hirsh-Pasek, Kathy, Lauren B. Adamson, Roger Bakeman, Margaret Tresch Owen, Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, Amy Pace, Paula Yust, and Katharine Suma, “The Contribution of Early Communication to Low-Income Children’s Language Success,” Psychological Science 26, no. 7 (2015): 1071-83.

Konishi, H., Kanero, J., Freeman, M. R., Golinkoff, R. M., & Hirsh-Pasek, K. (2014). Six principles of language development: Implications for second language learners. Developmental Neuropsychology, 39(5), 404-420.

McCathren, R. B., and J. H. Allor. 2002. “Using Storybooks with Preschool Children: Enhancing Language and Emergent Literacy.” Young Exceptional Children 5, no. 4: 3-10.

Mendelsohn, Alan L., Carolyn Brockmeyer Cates, Adriana Weisleder, Samantha Berkule Johnson, Anne M. Seery, Caitlin F. Canfield, Harris S. Huberman, Benard P. Dreyer, “Reading Aloud, Play, and Social-Emotional Development,” Pediatrics 141 no. 5 (2018): e20173393.

Ninio, Anat, and Jerome Bruner. “The Achievement and Antecedents of Labelling.” Journal of Child Language 5 (1978): 1–15.

Partnership for 21st Century Learning, “Framework for 21st Century Learning,” 2007, p21.0rg/our-work/p21-framework/. Last accessed August 11, 2018.

Ribot KM, Hoff E, Burridge A. Language Use Contributes to Expressive Language Growth: Evidence From Bilingual Children. Child Dev. 2017; n/a-n/a. https://doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12770 PMID: 28245341

Roseberry, S., Hirsh‐Pasek, K., & Golinkoff, R. M. (2014). Skype me! Socially contingent interactions help toddlers learn language. Child development, 85(3), 956-970.

Thompson, Rachel H., Nicole M. Cotnoir-Bichelman, Paige M. McKerchar, Trista L. Tate, and Kelly A. Dancho, “Enhancing Early Communication through Infant Sign Training,” L. Hagopian, ed. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis 40 no. 1 (2007):15-23.

Vivas, Eleonora. 1996. “Effects of Story Reading on Language.” Language Learning 46, no.

Weisleder, A., & Fernald, A. (2013). Talking to children matters: Early language experience strengthens processing and builds vocabulary. Psychological Science, 24(11), 2143-21

Websites and online articles

Talking with children matters: Defending the 30 million word gap

Reading & Writing / Letter Knowledge

Hirsch, E. D., and Linda Bevilacqua. What your preschooler needs to know: read-alouds to get ready for kindergarten. New York, NY: Bantam Dell, 2008.

Hirsh-Pasek, Kathy, and Roberta M. Golinkoff. 2007. Celebrate the Scribble: Appreciating Children’s Art. Easton, PA: Crayola Beginnings.

Juel, Connie. 1988. “Learning to Read and Write: A Longitudinal Study of 54 children From First Through Fourth Grades.” Journal of Educational Psychology 80, No. 4: 437–447.

Juel, Connie. 1988. “Learning to Read and Write: A Longitudinal Study of 54 children From First Through Fourth Grades.” Journal of Educational Psychology 80, No. 4: 437–447.

Juel, C., G. Biancarosa, D. Coker, and R. Deffes. 2003. “Walking With Rosie: A Cautionary Tale of Early Reading Instruction.” Educational Leadership 60, No. 7 (April): 12-18.

Justice, Laura, and Kara L. Pences. 2005. Scaffolding with Storybooks: A Guide for Enhancing Young Children’s Language and Literacy Achievement. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

Linder, Toni W. 1999. Read, Play, and Learn! Storybook Activities for Young Children : Teacher’s Guide. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes.

Mol, S.E., A.G. Bus, & M.T. de Jong. 2009. “Interactive Book Reading in Early Education: A Tool to Stimulate Print Knowledge as Well as Oral Language.” Review of Educational Research 79 (2): 979–1007.

Schickendanz, Judith A. 1999. Much More Than ABCs: The Early Stages of Reading and Writing. Washington: National Association for the Education of Young Children.

Schickedanz, Judith A. 2008. Increasing the Power of Instruction: Integration of Language, Literacy, and Math Across the Preschool Day. Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children.

Snow, Catherine E., M. Susan Burns, and Peg Griffin, eds.  1998.  Preventing Reading Difficulties in Young Children.  National Research Council.  Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.

General Knowledge & STEM

Jordan, N. C., Kaplan, D., Ramineni, C., & Locuniak, M. N. (2009). Early math matters: Kindergarten number competence and later mathematics outcomes. Developmental Psychology, 45, 850–867. doi:10.1037/a0014939

LeFevre, J., Fast, L., Skwarchuk, S., Smith-Chant, B., Bisanz, J., Kamawar, D., & Penner-Wilger, M. (2010). Pathways to mathematics: Longitudinal predictors of
performance. Child Development, 81, 1753–1767. doi:10.1111/j.1467- 8624.2010.01508.x

Needham, A., Dueker, G., & Lockhead, G. 2005. “Infants’ Formation and Use of Categories to Segregate Objects.” Cognition 94, no. 3: 215-240.

Phillips, Beth M. · Morse, E. Erika. Family Child Care Learning Environments: Caregiver Knowledge and Practices Related to Early Literacy and Mathematics. Early Childhood Education Journal (2011)

Priebe, S.J., J.M. Keenan & A.C. Miller. 2011. “How Prior Knowledge Affects Word Identification and Comprehension.” Reading and Writing 7(1): 581-586. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3142886/

Sarama, Julie, and Douglas H. Clements. “Building Blocks and Cognitive Building Blocks: Playing to Know the World Mathematically.” American Journal of Play 1:3, 2009, 313-337. http://www.journalofplay.org/sites/www.journalofplay.org/files/pdf-articles/1-3-article-building-blocks-cognitive-building-blocks.pdf

Sharapan, Hedda. 2012. “From STEM to STEAM: How Early Childhood Educators Can Apply Fred Rogers’ Approach.” Young Children 67, no.1: 36-40.

Suskind, Dana, Beth Suskind, and Leslie Lewinter-Suskind, Thirty Million Words: Building a Child’s Brain (New York: Dutton, 2015): 51, 48-49.

Math

Amalric, M., and Stanislas Dehaene. (2018). Cortical circuits for mathematical knowledge: evidence for a major subdivision within the brain’s semantic networks.

Berkowitz, T, Schaeffer, M., Maloney, E. A., Peterson, L., Gregor, C., Levine, S. C., and Beilock, S. L. (2015). Math at home adds up to achievement in school. Science, 196-198.

Blair, C. B., & McKinnon, R. D. (2016). Moderating effects of executive functions and the teacher–child relationship on the development of mathematics ability in kindergarten. Learning and Instruction, 41, 85–93. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.learninstruc.2015.10.001

Bull, R., Espy, K. A., & Wiebe, S. A. (2008). Short-term memory, working memory, and executive functioning in preschoolers: Longitudinal predictors of mathematical achievement at age 7 years.  Developmental Neuropsychology, 33, 205–228.

Bull, R.  & Scerif, G. (2001) Executive Functioning as a Predictor of Children’s Mathematics Ability: Inhibition, Switching, and Working Memory, Developmental Neuropsychology, 19:3, 273-293, DOI: 10.1207/S15326942DN1903_3

Duncan, G. J., Dowsett, C. J., Claessens, A., Magnuson, K., Huston, A. C., Klebanov, P, et al. (2007). School readiness and later achievement. Developmental Psychology, 43, 1428 –1446.

Cannon, J., & Ginsburg, H. P. (2008). “Doing the Math”: Maternal Beliefs About Early Mathematics Versus Language Learning. Early Education & Development, 19, 238–260.

Clark, C. A. C., Pritchard, V. E., & Woodward, L. J. (2010). Preschool executive functioning abilities predict early mathematics achievement. Developmental Psychology, 46(5), 1176–1191.  https://doi.org/10.1037/a0019672

Geist, Eugene. “Support Math Readiness Through Music.” Https://families.naeyc.org/. NAEYC for Families.

Gunderson, E. A., & Levine, S. C. (2011). Some types of parent number talk count more than others: Relations between parents’ input and children’s number knowledge. Developmental Science, 14, 1021–1032.

Habegger, L. (2010). Number concept and rhythmic response in early childhood. Music Education Research 12 (3), 269-280. Doi: 10.1080/14613808.2010.504810

Hanner, E. Braham, E.J., Elliott, L., Libertus, M. E.  (2019) Promoting Math Talk in Adult–Child Interactions Through Grocery Store Signs. Mind, Brain and Education 13(2): 110-118. https://doi.org/10.1111/mbe.12195

Jordan, N. C., Kaplan, D., Ramineni, C., & Locuniak, M. N. (2009). Early math matters: Kindergarten number competence and later mathematics outcomes. Developmental Psychology, 45, 850–867. doi:10.1037/a0014939

Klein, Alice, et al. “Scaling Up an Effective Pre-K Mathematics Intervention: Mediators and Child Outcomes.” Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness (2011)

LeFevre, J.-A., Berrigan, L., Vendetti, C., Kamawar, D., Bisanz, J., Skwarchuk, S.-L., & Smith-Chant, B. L. (2013). The role of executive attention in the acquisition of mathematical skills for children in grades 2 through 4. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 114(2), 243–261. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2012.10.005

Levine, Susan C., Linda Whealton Suriyakham, Meredith L. Rowe, Janellen Huttenlocher, and Elizabeth A. Gunderson, et al. “What counts in the development of young children’s number knowledge?.” Developmental psychology 46.5 (2010): 1309.

Mix, K. S., Sandhofer, C. M., Moore, J. A., & Russell, C. (2012). Acquisition of the cardinal word principle: The role of input. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 27, 274–283.

Miller, M. R., Rittle-Johnson, B., Loehr, A. M., & Fyfe, E. R. (2016). The influence of relational
knowledge and executive function on preschoolers’ repeating pattern knowledge. Journal of Cognition and Development, 17(1), 85–104.  https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2015.1023307

Nguyen, T., Watts, T. W., Duncan, G. J., Clements, D. H., Sarama, J. S., Wolfe, C., & Spitler, M. E. (2016). Which preschool mathematics competencies are most predictive of fifth grade achievement? Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 36, 550-560.

Núñez Castellar, E., All, A., de Marez, L., & Van Looy, J. (2015). Cognitive abilities, digital
games and arithmetic performance enhancement: A study comparing the effects of a math
game and paper exercises. Computers & Education, 85(0), 123–133. https://doi.org/10.1016/j. compedu.2014.12.021

Ramani, G. B., Rowe, M. L., Eason, S. H., & Leech, K. a. (2015). Math talk during informal learning activities in Head Start families. Cognitive Development, 35, 15–33.

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Vandermaas-Peeler, M., *Nelson, J., Bumpass, C. & Sassine, B. (2009). Numeracy-related exchanges in joint storybook reading and play. International Journal of Early Years Education, 17, 67-84.

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Essential Components for an Early Literacy Program

Repetition

Blank, M., Frank, S. M. 1971. “Story Recall in Kindergarten Children: Effect of Method of Presentation on Psycholinguistic Performance.” Child Development 42: 299-312.

Bowman, David. 2011. “Read It Again, Sam” The York Times, Sunday Book Review, December 4: BR75. www.nytimes.com/2011/12/04/books/review/read-it-again-sam.html?pagewanted=all.

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Călinescu, Matei. 1993. Rereading. New Haven: Yale University Press.

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Frey, Nancy; Fisher, Douglas. Reading and the Brain: What Early Childhood Educators Need to Know. Early Childhood Education Journal, v38 n2 p103-110 Aug 2010

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Kryczka, Cathie. 2008. “Again! Again!: Read the Same Book 38 Times in One Sitting? Why Kids Love Repetition – and How to Keep Your Sanity.” Today’s Parent 25, no. 2: 47-48.

Linder, Toni W. 1999. Read, Play, and Learn! Storybook Activities for Young Children : Teacher’s Guide. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes.

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McGee, Lea M., & Schickedanz, Judith A. (2007). Repeated interactive read-alouds in preschool and kindergarten. The Reading Teacher. 60(8), 742-751.

Meyer, Marianne, and Rebecca Felton. 1999. “Repeated Reading to Enhance Fluency: Old Approaches and New Directions.” Annals of Dyslexia. 49, no. 1: 283-306.

Morrow, Lesley Mandel. 1985. “Retelling Stories: A Strategy for Improving Young Children’s Comprehension, Concept of Story Structure, and Oral Language Complexity.” The Elementary School Journal 85, no. 5: 646-661.

Nachmias, M., M. Gunnar, S. Mangelsdorf, R.H. Parritz, and K. Buss. 1996. “Behavioral Inhibition and Stress Reactivity: The Moderating Role of Attachment Security.” Child Development 67: 508-522.

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Pellegrini, A.D., & Galda, L. (1982). The effects of thematic-fantasy play training on the development of children’s story comprehension. American Educational Research Journal, 19, 443-452. doi:10.2307/11627

Rowe, D. (1998). The literate potentials of book-related dramatic play. Reading Research Quarterly, 33, 10-35. doi:10.1598/RRQ.33.1.2

Samuels, S. Jay. 1997. “The Method of Repeated Readings.” Reading Teacher 50, no. 5: 376-81.

Saville, Kirt. Strategies for Using Repetition as a Powerful Teaching Tool. Music Educators Journal, v98 n1 p69-75 Sep 2011.

Schenck, Jeb. “Movement and Decision-Making in Memory” (presentation, Learning and the Brain Conference VIII, Cambridge, MA, April 24–27, 2003)*

Schickedanz, Judith A. 2008. Increasing the Power of Instruction: Integration of Language, Literacy, and Math Across the Preschool Day. Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children.

Susina, Jan. 1998. “Children’s Reading, Repetition, and Rereading: Gertrude Stein, Margaret Wise Brown, and Goodnight Moon.” In Second Thoughts: A Focus on Rereading, edited by David Galef. Detroit, Michigan: Wayne State University Press.

Suzuki, Shinichi: Nurtured by Love: The Classic Approach to Talent Education. Translated by Waltraud Suzuki). Miami, FL: Suzuki Method International

Trammell, P. T. (1977). An investigation of the effectiveness of repetition and guided listening in developing enjoyable music listening experiences for second grade students. (Doctoral dissertation, Texas Women’s University, 1977). Dissertation Abstracts International, 38, 5323A-5324A. (University Microfilms No. 7801781)

Trelease, Jim. 2006. The Read-Aloud Handbook. New York: Penguin.

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Ritual

Chvojicek, Ruth, Mary Henthorne and Nola Larson. 2001. Transition Magician for Families: Helping Parents and Children with Everyday Routines. St. Paul, MN: Readleaf Press.

Gillespie, Linda; Petersen, Sandra. Rituals and Routines: Supporting Infants and Toddlers and Their Families. Young Children, v67 n4 p76-77 Sep 2012.

Harris, Teresa T.; Fuqua, J. Diane. What Goes Around Comes Around: Building a Community of Learners through Circle Times. Young Children, v55 n1 p44-47 Jan 2000.

Reich, Lena Rubinstein. Circle Time in Pre-School. Reprints and Miniprints from Department of Educational and Psychological Research. No. 785. 1993. http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED366465.pdf

A Fun, Positive Environment

Azar, Beth. 1997. Environment is key to serotonin levels. APA Monitor. (April)

Azar, Beth. 2002. “It’s More Than Fun and Games.” Monitor on Psychology 3, No. 3 (March): American Psychological Association, www.apa.org/monitor/mar02/morefun.html

Barry, R.A., & G. Kochanska. 2010. “A Longitudinal Investigation of the Affective Environment in Families With Young Children: From Infancy to Early School Age.” Emotion 10 (2): 237–49.

Berger, K. S. 2001. The Developing Person Through Childhood and Adolescence. Macmillan.

Benson, Herbert and Miriam Z. Kipper. 1990. The Relaxation Response. New York: Avon.

Bus, A. G., J. Belsky, M.H. van IJzendoorn, and K. Crnic. 1997. “Attachment and Bookreading Patterns: A Study of Mothers, Fathers, and their Toddlers.” Early Childhood Research Quarterly 12: 81-98.

Cardoso, Silvia H. 2000. “Our Ancient Laughing Brain.” Cerebrum 2, No. 4 (Fall): 15-30.

Carlson, Ann D. The Preschooler & the Library. Metuchen: Scarecrow, 1991.

Carlson, Ann D. Concept Books and Young Children. http://comminfo.rutgers.edu/professional-development/childlit/books/CARLSON.pdf , accessed 12/18/09

Conlon, Alice. 1992. “Giving Mrs. Jones a Hand: Making Group Storytime More Pleasurable and Meaningful for Young Children.” Young Children 47, no. 3: 14-18.

Curtis, Deb., and Margie Carter. Designs for Living and Learning: Transforming Early Childhood Environments. St. Paul, MN: Redleaf Press: 2003.

Forencich, Frank. 2006. Exuberant Animal: The Power of Health, Play, and Joyful Movement. Bloomington, IN: AuthorHouse.

Frank, M. G., & Ekman, P. (1996). Physiologic effects of the smile. Directions in Psychiatry16(25), 1-8.

Frederickson, B. L. “The Role of Positive Emotions in Positive Psychology,” American Psychologist 56, no. 3 (2001): 218–26.

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Fredrickson, B. 1998. “What Good are Positive Emotions?” Review of General Psychology 2: 300–319.

Grandey, A. A., Fisk, G. M., Mattila, A. S., Jansen, K. J., & Sideman, L. A. (2005). Is “service with a smile” enough? Authenticity of positive displays during service encounters. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 96(1), 38-55.

Greenough, William T. James E. Black, and Christopher S. Wallace, “Early Experience and Brain Development,” Child Development 58 (1987): 539–59.

Iacoboni, M. (2009). Mirroring people: The new science of how we connect with others. Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Johnson, Sara B., Anne W. Riley, Douglas A. Granger, and Jenna Riis, “The Science of Early Life Toxic Stress for Pediatric Practice and Advocacy,” Pediatrics 131, no. 2 (2013): 319-327.

McCracken, Janet Brown (ed.) 1986. Reducing Stress in Young Children’s Lives. Washington, D.C.: National Association for the Education of Young Children.

Meaney, Michael J. “Maternal Care, Gene Expression, and the Transmission of Individual Differences in Stress Reactivity across Generations,” Annual Review of Neuroscience 24, no. 1 (2001): 1161–92.

Rychlowska, M., Cañadas, E., Wood, A., Krumhuber, E. G., Fischer, A., & Niedenthal, P. M. (2014). Blocking mimicry makes true and false smiles look the same. PloS one, 9(3), e90876. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0090876

Shore, D. M., & Heerey, E. A. (2011). The value of genuine and polite smiles. Emotion, 11(1), 169.

Smidl, Sarah. 2016. Playing, Laughing, and Learning in Preschool. Teaching Young Children 8, no. 5, 6-7.

Sommers, J., & Vodanovich, S. J. (2000). Boredom proneness: Its relationship to psychological‐and physical‐health symptoms. Journal of clinical psychology, 56(1), 149-155.

Stossel, Scott. “What Makes Us Happy, Revisited.” The Atlantic. May 2013. http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2013/05/thanks-mom/309287/

Suomi, S. J. 1991. “Early Stress and Adult Emotional Reactivity in Rhesus Monkeys.” In The Childhood Environment and Adult Disease edited by G.R. Bock and J. Whelan. Chichester, England: John Wiley & Sons.

Suomi, Steve. 1997. Frontiers of Science: Stress and Coping During Infancy. Presented at ZERO TO THREE’s 12th National Training Institute, December 1997, in Nashville, TN.

Play

Almon, J. 2018. “Improving Children’s Health Through Play: Exploring Issues and Recommendations.” Alliance for Childhood.  Retrieved from:  https://usplaycoalition.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/Play-and-Health-White-Paper-FINAL.pdf

Almon, Joan. The Value of Risk in Children’s Play. Annapolis, MD: Alliance for Childhood. 2013.  Retrieved from: http://www.waldorfresearchinstitute.org/pdf/BAPlayAlmon.pdf

Andersen, Charlotte. “Blocks: A Versatile Learning Tool for Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow.” Spotlight on Teaching Preschoolers 2, National Association for the Education of Young Children, 2010, p. 24-27

Badegruber, Bernie. 2005. 101 Life Skills Games for Children: Learning, Growing, Getting Along (ages 6 to 12). Alameda, CA: Hunter House.

Beckoff, Marc. 2001. Social Play Behavior: cooperation, Fairness, Trust, and the Evolution of Morality. Journal of Consciousness Studies 8, No. 2: 81-90.

Bergen, Doris. “Play as the Learning Medium for Future Scientists, Mathematicians, and Engineers..” American Journal of Play 1:4, 2009. 413-428. http://www.journalofplay.org/sites/www.journalofplay.org/files/pdf-articles/1-4-article-play-as-learning-medium.pdf

Bergen, Doris. 2002. “The Role of Pretend Play in Children’s Cognitive Development.” Early Childhood Research and Practice 4, no. 1, http://ecrp.uiuc.edu/v4n1/bergen.htmlhttp://ecrp.uiuc.edu/v4n1/bergen.html.

Bergen, Doris, and Daria Mauer. 2000. “Symbolic Play, Phonological Awareness, and Literacy Skills at Three Age Levels.” In Play and Literacy in Early Childhood: Research from Multiple Perspectives, edited by Kathleen A. Roskos and James F. Christie, 45-62. New York: Erlbaum.

Bergen, Doris. “Play as the Learning Medium for Future Scientists, Mathematicians, and Engineers..” American Journal of Play 1:4, 2009. 413-428. http://www.journalofplay.org/sites/www.journalofplay.org/files/pdf-articles/1-4-article-play-as-learning-medium.pdf

Bettelheim, Bruno. 1987. “The Importance of Play,” Atlantic Monthly (March): 37.

Blakely, Kim, Mary Ann Lang & Roger Hart. 1991. Getting in Touch with Play: Creating Play Environments for Children with Visual Impairments. New York: Lighthouse National Center for Vision and Child Development.

Brotherson, Sean. “What Young Children Learn Though Play.” North Dakota State University Extension Services, Fargo, North Dakota, Sept. 2009.
http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/pubs/yf/famsci/fs1430.pdf

Brown, Stuart, with Christopher Vaughan. 2009. Play: How it Shapes the Brain, Opens the Imagination, and Invigorates the Soul. New York: Penguin.

Buchanan, Michelle and Tricia Giovacco Johnson. “A Second Look at the Play of Young Children with Disabiltiies.” American Journal of Play 2:1, 2009, 41-59. http://www.journalofplay.org/sites/www.journalofplay.org/files/pdf-articles/2-1-article-play-of-young-children-with-diabilities.pdf

Carlson, Frances M. 2011. Big Body Play: Why Boisterous, Vigorous, and Very Physical Play is Essential to Children’s Development and Learning. Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children.

Celano, D.,  Knapczyk, J.J., Neuman, S.  2018. “Public Libraries Harness the Power of Play.” Young Children 73:3.

Charner, Kathy, and Maureen Murphy. 2004. The Giant Encyclopedia of Preschool Activities for Four-Year Olds. Beltsville, MD: Gryphon House.

Christakis D, et al. 2007. Effect of block play on language acquisition and attention in toddlers: A pilot RCT. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med, 161:967-971.

Christie, James, and Billie Enz. 1992. “The Effects of Literacy Play Interventions on Preschoolers’ Play Patterns and Literacy Development.” Early Education & Development 3, no. 3: 205-220

Church, Ellen Booth. 2003. Best-Ever Circle Time Activities: Back to School: 50 Instant & Irresistible Meet-and-Greet Activities, Learning Games, and Language-Building Songs and Rhymes. New York: Scholastic Professional Books.

Clouder, Christopher and Janni Nicol. Creative Play for your toddler. New York: Sterling Publishing, 2008.

Cohen, Lawrence J. Playful Parenting. New York: Ballantine Books, 2001.

Colker, Laura J. “Blocks.” Teaching Young Children 4:1, 16-17.

Colker, Laura J. “Block Off Time for Learning.” Teaching Young Children 1:3, National Association for the Education of Young Children, May 2008, p. 14-17. http://www.naeyc.org/files/tyc/file/Block%20Off%20Time.pdf

Conner, Bobbi. Unplugged Play. New York: Workman Publishing, 2007.

Elkind, David. 2007. The Power of Play: Learning What Comes Naturally. Cambridge, MA: Da Capo Press.

Elkind, David. “The Power of Play: Learning What Comes Naturally.” American Journal of Play Summer 2008, 1:1, 1-6. http://www.journalofplay.org/sites/www.journalofplay.org/files/pdf-articles/1-1-article-elkind-the-power-of-play.pdf

Gariepy, N, Howe, N. 2003. “The Therapeutic Power of Play: Examining the Play of Young Children with Leukaemia.” Child Care, Health and Development 29, No. 6 (November): 523-537.

Gopnik, Alison. “How Much Do Toddlers Learn from Play?” Wall Street Journal May 11, 2017, accessed August 11, 2018.

Grabarek, Kristin and Mary R. Lanni. 2018. Early Learning Through Play: Library Programming for Diverse Communities. Libraries Unlimited.

Graham, n., Nye, C., Mandy, A., Clarke, C., Morriss-Roberts, C. 2018. The meaning of play for children and young paople with physical disabilities: A systematic thematic synthesis. Child: Care, Health and Development: The Multidisciplinary Journal 44(2): 173-182.

Gray, Peter. “Play as Preparation for Learning and Life: An Interview with Peter Gray.” American Journal of Play 5:3, Rochester, NY: The Strong. http://www.journalofplay.org/sites/www.journalofplay.org/files/pdf-articles/5-3-interview-play-as-preparation.pdf

Gronlund, Gaye. 2010. Developmentally Appropriate Play: Guiding Children to a Higher Level. St. Paul, MN: Readleaf Press.

Hanline, M.F. 2001. “Supporting Emergent Literacy in Play-Based Activities. Young Exceptional Children 4:4, 10-15.

Henderson, T.Z., & Atencio, D.J. (2007). Integration of play, learning, and experience: What museums afford young visitors. Early Childhood Education Journal, 35, 245-251. doi: 10.1007/s10643-007-0208-1

Hewitt, Karen. “Blocks as a tool for learning: A historical and contemporary perspective.” Young Children 56.1 (2001): 6-14.

Hider, Jawaid. 2001. “Learning to Play and Playing to Learn: An Integrative Approach to Designing for Children.” Hands On! Europe Conference 14-16 November 2001, Stratford, East London.

Hirsh-Pasek, Kathy & Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, with Diane Eyer. 2003. Einstein Never Used Flash Cards. Emmaus, Pennsylvania: Rodale.

Hirsh-Pasek, Kathy, and Roberta M. Golinkoff. 2011. Play = Learning: How Play Motivates and Enhances Children’s Cognitive and Social-Emotional Growth. http://udel.edu/~roberta/play/index.html.

Homeyer, Linda E. and Mary O. Morrison. “Play Therapy: Practice, Issues, and Trends.” American Journal of Play Fall 2008, 220-228.

Howard, J. 2002. “Eliciting young children’s perceptions of play, work, and learning using the activity apperception story procedure. Early Child Development and Care 127(5), 489-502.

Huttenlocher, J., Waterfall, H., Vasilyeva, m., Vevea, J., Hedges, L.V. (2010). Sources of variability in children’s language growth. Cognitive Psychology 61:4, 343-365.

Karr-Morse, Robin, and Meredith S. Wiley. Ghosts from the Nursery: Tracing the roots of violence. (New York: The Atlantic Monthly Press, 1997.

Kempe (eds.) Encyclopedia of Language Development, (Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 2014), 467-471.

Koops, Lisa Huisman. 2012. “Creating Music Play Zones for Children.” Perspectives: Journal of the Early Childhood and Movement Association 7(3-4): 9-15.

Lackney, Jeffery A. “Learning Environments in Children’s Museums: Aesthetics, Environmental Preference and Creativity.” Paper presented at a meeting of the Association for Youth Museums and the Institute for Civil Society (Baltimore, MD, May2000). For full text: http://schoolstudio.engr.wisc.edu/childrensmuseum.html.

LEGO®, DUPLO®, and ALSC. (2013). “Read, Play, Build Librarians Toolkit” http://www.ala.org/alsc/sites/ala.org.alsc/files/content/Read-Build-Play_Librarian-Toolkit.pdf

Leonard, Dorothy and Tim Bridges. “Why Kids — and Workers — Need to Get Their Hands Dirty. Harvard Business Review Blog Network, October 9, 2013. http://blogs.hbr.org/2013/10/why-kids-and-workers-need-to-get-their-hands-dirty/

Leong, Deborah J. and Elena Bodrova.”Assessing and Scaffolding Make-Believe Play.” Young Children, January 2012, p. 26-24.

Linder, Toni W. 1999. Read, Play, and Learn! Storybook Activities for Young Children : Teacher’s Guide. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes.

Linn, Susan. The Case for Make Believe: Saving Play in a Commercialized World. New York: The New Press, 2008.

Marjanovič-Umek, L., Fekonja-Peklaj, U., & Podlesek, A. 2013. “The effect of parental involvement and encouragement on preschool children’s symbolic play.” Early Child Development and Care, 1-14.

Masterson, Marie L. & Holly Bohart, eds. 2019. Serious Fun: How Guided Play Extends Children’s Learning. Washington, DC: NAEYC.

Mayfield, M. I. (2005). Children’s museums: Purposes, practices, and play? Early Child Development and Care, 175(2), 179-192. doi: 10.1080/0300443042000230348

McCune, L. 1995. “A normative study of representational play at the transition to language.” Developmental Psychology 31: 198-206.

Miller, Edward & Almon, Joan. Crisis in the Kindergarten: why Children Need to Play in School. College Park: Alliance for Childhood. 2009.

Morgan, Amanda. “Enchanted Learning: The Benefits of Fantasy Play for Children.” Not Just Cute blog, July 6, 2010, http://notjustcute.com/2010/07/06/enchanted-learning-the-benefits-of-fantasy-play-for-children/

Moynihan, Nora, and Betsy Diamant-Cohen. “It’s All Fun and Games in Tiny’s Diner: Preschool Programming in Unusual Spaces.” Journal of Museum Education 37:3 (2012): 91-98

Murphy, Pat, Ellen Macaulay, Jason Gorski, and the staff of the Exploratorium. 2006. Exploratopia. New York: Little Brown and Company.

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Nespeca, Sue McCleaf. The Importance of Play, Particularly Constructive Play, in Public Library Programming. . Adopted by ALSC’s Board of Directors, September 10, 2012. http://www.ala.org/alsc/sites/ala.org.alsc/files/content/FINAL%20Board%20Approved%20White%20Paper%20on%20Play.pdf

Oppenheim, Joanne and Stephanie. 2006. Read it! Play It! Babies and Toddlers.

Paley, Vivian Gussin. 2005. A Child’s Work, the Importance of Fantasy Play. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Paley, Vivian Gussin. The Girl with the Brown Crayon. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1997.

Panksepp, Jaak, Jeff Burgdorf, Cortney Turner, and Nakia Gordon. 2003. “Modeling ADHD-type Arousal with Unilateral Frontal Cortex Damage in Rats and Beneficial Effects of Play Therapy.” Brain and Cognition 52, No. 1 (June):97-105.

Piaget, Jean. Play, Dreams and Imitation in Childhood (New York: W. W. Norton, 1962).

Prairie, Arleen Pratt. ”Supporting Sociodramatic Play in Ways that Enhance Academic Learning.” Young Children May 2013 68:2, 62-68.

Rendon, T., & G. Gronlund. 2017. Saving Play: Addressing Standards Through Play-Based Learning in Preschool and Kindergarten. St. Paul, MN: Redleaf.

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Rogers, Cosby W. and Janet K. Sawyers. Play in the Lives of Children. Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children, 1988

Roopnarine, Jaipaul L., Meera Shin, Kwanghee Jung, and Ziarat Hossain. “Play and Early Development and Education: The Instantiation of Parental Belief Systems.” Chapter 7 in Contemporary Perspectives on Play in Early Childhood Education. Information Age Publishing, 115-132.

Roskos, Kathleen A., James F. Christie, and Donald J. Richgels, “The Essentials of Early Literacy Instruction,” Young Children 58, no. 2 (March 2003): 52–60

Roskos, Kathleen, and James Christie. “The Play-Literacy Nexus and the Importance of Evidence-Based Techniques it the Classroom.” American Journal of Play 4:2, 2001, 204-224. http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ985588.pdf

Roskos, Kathleen A., and James F. Christie (Eds.), Play and Literacy in Early Childhood: Research From Multiple Perspectives. New York: Erlbaum.

Roskos, Kathleen, and Susan Neuman. 1998. “Play as an Opportunity for Literacy. In Multiple Perspectives on Play in Early Childhood, edited by Olivia N. Saracho and Bernard Spodek, 100-115. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.

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Shimpi, P. & Nicholson, J. (2013). “Using cross-cultural, intergenerational play narratives to explore issues of social justice and equity in discourse on children’s play.” Early Child Development and Care, oi/abs/10.1080/03004430.2013.813847

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Online Resources

Movement

Alcock, K.J.,and Krawczyk, K.(2010).Individual differences inl anguage development: relationship with motor skill at 21 months. Dev.Sci. 13, 677–691. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-7687.2009.00924.x

Barlin, Anne and Paul. 1971. The Art of Learning through Movement. Los Angeles: Ward Ritchie.

Barlin, Ann Lief. 1979. Teaching Your Wings to Fly: The Nonspecialist’s Guide to Movement Activities for Young Children. Santa Monica, CA: Goodyear.

Campos, J. J., Bertenthal, B. I., and Kermoian, R. (1992). Early experience and emotional development. Psychol. Sci. 3, 61–64. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-9280.1992.tb00259.x

Carlson, Frances M. 2011. Big Body Play: Why Boisterous, Vigorous, and Very Physical Play is Essential to Children’s Development and Learning. Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children

Carson, Jenn. 2018. Get Your Community Moving. Chicago: ALA Editions.

Chronopoulou, E., & Vassiliki, R. (2012). The contribution of music and movement activities to creative thinking in pre-school children. Creative Education 3(2), 196-204. Dopi; 10.4236/ce.2012.32031

Dennison, Paul E., and Gail E. Dennison. 1992. Brain Gym: Simple Activities for Whole Brain Learning (Orange). Venture, CA: Edu Kinestheics.

Freeman, Judy. 1990. Books Kids Will Sit Still for: The Complete Read-Aloud Guide. New York: Bowker.

Frick, Andrea and Wenke Möhring, 2015. “A Matter of Balance: Motor Control is Related to Children’s Spatial and Proportional Reasoning Skills.”  Frontiers in Psychol. 6:

Gunderson, E. A., Ramirez, G., Beilock, S. L., and Levine, S. C. (2012). The relation between spatial skill and early number knowledge: the role of the linear number line. Dev. Psychol. 48, 1229–1241. doi: 10.1037/a0027433

Hannaford, Carla. Smart Moves: Why Learning is Not All in Your Head. (Arlington, VA: Great Ocean, 1995); Jeb Schenck, “Building the Memory Bank,” Cable in the Classroom, March 2003, 18–23.

Healy, Jane M., 2010. “Different learners: why music and movement are brain food for every child.” Perspectives: Journal of the Early Childhood Music & Movement Association 5(4): 9-13. GREAT ARTICLE

Hemple, K.M., J.J. Batey, & L.C. Hartle, 2008, “Music Play,” Teaching Young Children 1 (2): 10–12. – See more at: http://families.naeyc.org/learning-and-development/music-math-more/playing-music-home#sthash.xY59dgHA.dpuf

HighScope (Spring 2011). ReSource: Magazine for Educators. Active Learning for Infants and Toddlers. http://www.highscope.org/file/NewsandInformation/ReSourceReprints/Spring2011/ReSource2011spring_72.pdf

Käll, Lina Bunketorp, Helge Malmgren, Erik Olsson, Thomas Lindén, Michael Nilsson. 2015. Effects of a Curricular Physical Activity Intervention on Children’s School Performance, Wellness, and Brain Development. Journal of School Health 85: 10, 704-713.

Kerr, R., Booth, B. 1978. “Specific and Varied Practice of Motor Skill.” Perceptual and Motor Skills 46, no. 2: 395-401.

Libertus, Klaus and Dominic A. Violi. 2016. “Sit to Talk: Relation between Motor Skills and Language Development in Infancy.” Frontiers in Psychology 7, March 2016, article 475, 1-8.

Libertus, K., and Landa,R.J. (2014). Scaffolded reaching experiences encourage grasping activity in infants at high risk for Autism. Front. Psychol. 5:1071. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01071

Libertus, K., and Needham,A. (2010). Teach to reach: the effects of active vs. passive reaching experiences on action and perception. Vis.Res. 50, 2750–2757. doi: 10.1016/j.visres.2010.09.001

Libertus, K.,and Needham,A. (2011). Reaching experience increases face preference in 3-month-oldinfants. Dev.Sci. 14, 1355–1364.doi:10.1111/j.1467- 7687.2011.01084.x

Libertus, K., and Needham, A.(2014).Encouragement is nothing without control: factors influencing the development of reaching and face preference. J. Motor Learn.Dev. 2, 16–27.doi:10.1123/jmld.2013-0019

Libertus, K., Sheperd, K.A., Ross, S.W., and Landa, R.J. (2014). Limited fine motor and grasping skills in 6-month-old infants at high risk for Autism. ChildDev. 85, 2218–2231.doi:10.1111/cdev.12262

Lloyd,M., MacDonald,M., and Lord, Oudgenoeg-Paz, O., Volman, M.C., and Leseman, P. P.(2012). Attainment of sitting and walking predicts development of productive vocabulary between ages 16 and 28 months. InfantBehav.Dev. 35, 733–736.doi: 10.1016/j.infbeh.2012.07.010

Pica, Roe. 2001. Wiggle, Giggle and Shake. Beltsville, MD: Gryphon House.

Pohl, P., G. Carlsson, L. Bunktorp  Käll, M. Nilsson, C. Blomstrand. 2018. Experiences from a multimodal rhythm and music-based rehabilitation program in late phase of stroke recovery – A qualitative study. Plos One Sept. 28, 2018. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0204215

Poulsson, Emilie (author), L.J.Bridgman (illustrator), Cornelia C. Roeske (composer). 1971. Finger Plays for Nursery and Kindergarten. New York: Dover.

Ratey, John with Eric Hagerman, Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain (New York: Little, Brown and Company, 2013).

Schenck, Jeb. 2003b. “Movement and Decision-Making in Memory,” a session at the Learning and Brain Conference VIII in Cambridge, MA, April 24-27, 2003.

Music

Alipour, Z., Eskandari, N., Ahmari T.H., Eshaqh Hossaini, S.K., Sangi, S. 2013. Effects of music on physiological and behavrioral resopnses of premature infants: a randomized controlled trial. Complement ther Clin Pract. 2013 Aug; 19(3):128-32, doi: 10.1016/j.ctcp.2013.02.007. Epubli 2013 May 9.

Arnon,S., Shapsa, A., Forman, L., Regev, R., Bauer, S., Litmanovitz, I., and Dolfin, T. (2006) “Live Music is Beneficial to Preterm Infants in the Neonatal intensive Care Unit Environment. Birth [online]. 33(2), pp. 131-6/ [Accessed 29 June 2011]. Available from: http://ahealingharp.com/documents/NeonatalStudy.pdf

Auerbach, Christina and Aletta C. Delport. 2018. “Developing Mindfulness in Children through Participation in Music Activities,” South African Journal of Childhood Education 8 (1) : e1-e7. DOI 10.4102/sajce.v8i1.519

Bradt, J. Dileo, Cl., Grocke, D. and Magil, L. (2011). Music Interventions for Improving Psychological and Physical Outcomes in Cancer Patients (Review). Cochrane Database of systematic Reviews [online]. Issue 8, 2011. [Accessed 24 July 2012]

Brandes, V. (2009) in Haas, R. and Brandes, V. (eds) Music that Works: Contributions of Biology, Neurophysiology, Psychology, Sociology, Medicine and Musicology. New York: SpringerWien.

Cass-Beggs, Barbara, “How Music is First Introduced,” Ostinato 17 (January 1991):120-122.

Cass-Beggs, Barbara. 1981. “The Need for a Musical Environment During Babyhood.” JAACH (Journal – Association for the Care of Children’s Health) 9, no. 4: 132-135.

Cass-Beggs, Barbara. 1978. Your Baby Needs Music. North Vancouver, British Columbia: Douglas & McIntyre.

Cass-Beggs, Barbara. 1986. Your Child Needs Music. Mississauga, Ontario, Canada: The Frederick Harris Music Co.

Chronopoulou, E., & Vassiliki, R. (2012). The contribution of music and movement activities to creative thinking in pre-school children. Creative Education 3(2), 196-204. Dopi; 10.4236/ce.2012.32031

Cooper, S., & Cardany, A. (2008). Making connections: Promoting music making in the home through a preschool music program. General Music Today, 22, 1, 4-12.
English, W. 1979. “Brain Research and Music.” Paper presented at the C.M.E.A., Vancouver, B.C.

Fallin, Jana. 2010. “Let’s play! Infusing music in early childhood learning.” Perspectives: Journal of the Early Childhood Music & Movement Association 5(4): 14-17.

Feierabend, J. M. (2003). The book of echo songs (First Steps in Music Series). Chicago: GIA Publications.

Feierabend, J. M. (2003). The book of finger plays & action songs (First Steps in Music Series). Chicago: GIA Publications.

Feierabend, J. M. (2004). Songs and Rhymes with Beat Motions. Chicago: GIA Publications.

Fink, Cathy, and Marcy Marxer, “10 Ways Babies Learn When We Sing to Them!” NAEYC For Families. http://families.naeyc.org/learning-and-development/music-math-more/10-ways-babies-learn-when-we-sing-them

Freeman, Judy. 1997. Hi Ho Librario! Songs, Chants, and Stories to Keep Kids Humming. Bala Cynwyd, PA: Rock Hill Press.

Geist, Kamile, Eugene A. Geist, and Kathleen Kuznik. 2012. “The Patterns of Music: Young Children Learning Mathematics through Beat, Rhythm, and Melody.” Young Children 67, no. 1: 74-79.

Gerry, D., Unrau, A., & Trainor, L.J. (2012). Active music classes in infancy enhance musical, communicative and social development. Developmental Science

Haines, B. Joan E., and Linda L. Gerber. 2000. Leading Young Children to Music. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill.

Healy, Jane M., 2010. “Different learners: why music and movement are brain food for every child.” Perspectives: Journal of the Early Childhood Music & Movement Association 5(4): 9-13. GREAT ARTICLE

Hodges, Donald A. 2004. Musicality from Birth to Five. International Foundation for Music Research. Available:  www.music-research.org/Publications/V01N1_musicality .html

Jensen, Eric. 2000. Music with the Brain in Mind. San Diego, CA: The Brain Store.

Jersild, A.T., & Bienstock, S. F. (1935). Development of rhythm in young children. New York: Columbia University Press.

Kirkpartick, W., Jr. (1962). Relationships between the singing ability of prekindergarten children and their home environments. (Doctoral dissertation, University of Southern California, 1962). Dissertation Abstracts International, 23, 886A.

Kirscheimer, Sid. 2003. “Mom’s Voice is Distinguished in Womb.” WebMD Medical News Archive May 14, 2003. (Sources: Psychological Science May 2003. Barbara Kisilevsky, Anthony DeCasper). Available at: www.webmd.com/content/Article/64/72506.htm

Korup, Daveed. 2002. Tao Te Drum: Eastern Drumming for the Western Drummer. Baltimore, MD: Drumfest!

Levitan, Daniel J. 2000. “In Search of the Musical Mind.” Cerebrum 2 No. 4(Fall): 31-49. New York: Dana Press.

Love, A., & Burns, M.S. (2007). “It’s a hurricane! It’s a hurricane!”: Can music facilitate social constructive and sociodramatic play in a preschool classroom? The Journal of Genetic Psychology 167 (4), 383-391.

Parlakian, Rebecca with Claire Lerner (2010). Beyond Twinkle, Twinkle: Using Music with Infants and Toddlers. http://www.naeyc.org/files/yc/file/201003/ParlakianWeb0310.pdf

Pereira, C. S., Teixeira, J., Figueiredo, P., Xavier, J., Castro, S. L., & Brattico, E. (2011). Music and emotions in the brain: familiarity matters. PloS one6(11), e27241.  “Familiarity seems to be a crucial factor in making the listeners emotionally engaged with music, as revealed by fMRI data.”

Register, Dena. 2012. “Examining the Relationship Between Family Reported Literacy Behaviors, Early Literacy Skill Methods, and Engagement in Early Childhood Music Groups. Perspectives: Journal of the Early Childhood and Movement Association 7(3-4): 16-24.

Wilcox, E. (1999). Straight Talk about Music and Brain Research. Teaching Music 7, 3, 29-35.

Young, W. T. (1974). Musical development in preschool disadvantaged children. Journal of Research in Music Education 22, 3, 155-169.

Zbikow,

Zero to Three. 2002. Getting in Tune: The Powerful Influence of Music on Young Children’s Development. (Pamphlet) Washington: Zero to Three.

Zur, S S., & Johnson-Green, E. (2008). Time to transition: The connection between musical free play and school readiness. Childhood Education 84(5); 295-300.

Lullabies and the Need for Stress Reduction

Bargiel, M. (2002). Lullabies and Play Songs: Theoretical Considerations for an Early Attachment Music Therapy Intervention through Parental Singing for Developmentally At-Risk Infants. Canadian Journal of Music Therapy [online]. 9(1). [Accessed 26 August 2011]. Available from https://normt.uib.no/index.php/voices/article/viewArticle/149/125

Bartlett, Jessica Dym, Sheila Smith, Elizabeth Bringewatt. “Helping Young Children Who Have Experienced Trauma: Policies and Strategies for Early Care and Education – Executive Summary.” APR 27, 2017. Child Trends. https://www.childtrends.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/2017-21ExecSumECETrauma-1.pdf

Butzer, Bethany, Denise Bury, Shirley Telles, Sat Bir S. Khalsa. “Implementing Yoga Within the School Curriculum: A Scientific Rationale for Improving Social-Emotional Learning and Positive Student Outcomes.” Journal of Children’s Services 11 no. 1, (2016): 3-24.

Cass-Beggs, Barbara. 1978. Your Baby Needs Music. North Vancouver, British Columbia: Douglas & McIntyre.

Corbeil, Mariève, Sandra E. Trehub and Isabelle Peretz.  “Singing Delays the Onset of Infant Distress.”  Infancy. Published online September 22 2015 doi:10.1111/infa.12114.

Gunnar, M., and S. Mangelsdorf, R. Kestenbaum, S. Lang, M. Larson, and D. Andreas. 1989. “Stress and coping in early development.” In D. Cicchetti (Ed.), The Emergence of a Discipline: Rochestor Symposium on Developmental Psychopathology. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

McCracken, Janet Brown (ed.) 1986. Reducing Stress in Young Children’s Lives. Washington, D.C.: National Association for the Education of Young Children.

Meaney, M.J. 2001. “Maternal Care, Gene Expression, and the Transmission of Individual Differences in Stress Reactivity Across Generations.” Annual Review of Neuroscience 24: 1161-1192.

[ix] National Scientific Council on the Developing Child (2005/2014). Excessive stress disrupts the architecture of the developing brain: Working paper no. 3. Updated edition. Retrieved January 15, 2017 from www.developingchild.harvard.edu.

Parent-Child Bonding

Anisfeld, E., V. Casper, M. Nozyce, and N. Cunningham. 1990. “Does infant carrying promote attachment? An experimental study of the effects of increased physical contact on the development of attachment.” Child Development 61: 1617-1627.

Bailey, Becky. (2000) I Love You Rituals. HarperCollins.

Bigelow, Ann E. 2001. “Discovering Self Through Others: Infants’ Preference for Social Contingency.” Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic 65, No.3: 335-346.

Bus, A. G., & Van Ijzendoorn, M. H. (1995). Mothers reading to their 3-year-olds: The role of mother-child attachment security in becoming literate. Reading Research Quarterly, 998-1015.

Bus, A. G., J. Belsky, M.H. van IJzendoorn, and K. Crnic. 1997. “Attachment and Bookreading Patterns: A Study of Mothers, Fathers, and their Toddlers.” Early Childhood Research Quarterly 12: 81-98.

Bus, A. G., Van Ijzendoorn, M. H., & Pellegrini, A. D. (1995). Joint book reading makes for success in learning to read: A meta-analysis on intergenerational transmission of literacy. Review of educational research,65(1), 1-21.

Bus, A. G., & van Ijzendoorn, M. H. (1997). Affective dimension of mother-infant picturebook reading. Journal of School Psychology, 35(1), 47-60.

Caine, Renate Nummela and Geoffrey Caine. 1990. Making Connections: Teaching and the Human Brain. Nashville, TN: Incentive.

Cevasco, A.M. (2006) The Effects of Mother’s Maternal Singing on Full-Term and Preterm Infants and Maternal Emotional Responses [online]. PHD dissertation, The University of Florida State. [Accessed 29 June 2011]

Connell, Christian M., and Ronald J. Prinz. “The impact of childcare and parent–child interactions on school readiness and social skills development for low-income African American children.” Journal of School Psychology 40, no. 2 (2002): 177-193.

DeCasper, Anthony J., and Melanie J. Spence. “Prenatal maternal speech influences newborns’ perception of speech sounds.” Annual progress in child psychiatry and child development (1987): 5-25.

De Haan, Michelle, Olivier Pascalis, and Mark H. Johnson. 2002. “Specialization of Neural Mechanisms Underlying Face Recognition in Human Infants.” Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 14, No. 2: 199-209.

Gerhardt, S. (2004) Why Love Matters: how Affection Shapes a Baby’s Brain. Brunner-Routledge.

Goren, Carolyn C., Merrill Sarty, Paul Y.K. Wu. 1975. “Visual Following and Discrimination of Face-like Stimuli by Newborn Infants.” Pediatrics 56, No. 4 (October): 544-549.

Hamre, B. K., & Pianta, R. C. (2001). Early teacher-child relationships and the trajectory of children’s school outcomes through eighth grade. Child Development, 72, 625–638.

Honig, Alice. 2002. Secure Relationships: Nurturing Infant/Toddler Attachment in Early Care Settings. Washington, D.C.: National Association for the Education of You.

Honig, Alice. 2005. “The Language of Lullabies.” Young Children 60, No. 5 (September).

Iacoboni, M. (2009). Mirroring people: The new science of how we connect with others. Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Karen, Robert. Becoming Attached: First Relationships and How They Shape Our Capacity to Love. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.

Landy, Sarah. Pathways to Competence: Encouraging Healthy Social and Emotional Development in Young Children (Baltimore: Brookes, 2009).

Leblanc, É., Dégeilh, F., Daneault, V., Beauchamp, M. H., & Bernier, A. (2017). Attachment Security in Infancy: A Preliminary Study of Prospective Links to Brain Morphometry in Late Childhood. Frontiers in psychology8, 2141. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2017.02141

Lehrer, J. (2008). The mirror neuron revolution: Explaining what makes humans social. Scientific American.

McCormick, Ashley & Faith Eidson. (2018). “Early Intervention Professionals: What Does it Mean to Be Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health Informed?” The Active Learner Fall 2018, 22-25, 33.

Maitre, Nathalie L. et al. 2018. “The Dual Nature of Early-Life Experience on Somatosensory Processing in the Human Infant Brain.” Current Biology 27: 7, 1048-1054.

Maloney, Erin A., Converse, Benjamin A., Gibbs, Chloe R., Levine, Susan C., Beilock, Sian L. 2015. “Jump-Starting Early Childhood Education at Home: Early Learning, Parent Motivation, and Public Policy.” Perspectives on Psychological Science 10, no.6, 727-732.

Mayer, S. E., Kalil, A., Oreopoulos, P., & Gallegos, S. (2015). Using behavioral insights to increase parental engagement: The parents and children together (PACT) intervention (NBER Working Paper 21602). Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research. Retrieved from http://www.nber.org/papers/w21602.

Mondloch, C.L., Terri L. Lewis, D. Robert Budreau, Daphne Maurer, James L. Dannemiller, Benjamin R. Stephens, and Kathleen A. Kleiner-Gathercoal. 1999. “Face Perception During Early Infancy.” Psychological Science 10, No. 5 (September): 419.

National Scientific Council of the Developing Child. Children’s Emotional Development is Built Into the Architecture of Their Brains. (Working Paper #2). Waltham, MA: Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University.

National Scientific Council of the Developing Child. (2004). Young Children Develop in an Environment of Relationships. (Working Paper #2) .Waltham, MA: Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University. Available: www.developingchild.net/reports/shtml.

Posner, Micahel I., and Mary K. Rothbart. 2005. “Influencing Brain Networks: Implications for Education.” Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9:3, March 2005, 99-103

Reed, J., Hirsh-Pasek, K., & Golinkoff, R. M. (Under review). Learning on hold: Cell phones sidetrack parent-child interactions.

Reese, E. (1995). Predicting children’s literacy from mother-child conversations. Cognitive Development, 10(3), 381-405.

Rintoul, Betty. 2004. PowerPoint Presentation. Encouraging Connections. “Learning by Heart: Emotional Intelligence and School Readiness Conference.” Sponsored by the Maryland State Department of Education, Maryland Committee for Children, Baltimore Child Care Resource Center, Child Care Links, Baltimore County.

Schore, A. 2001. “Effects of Secure Attachment on Right Brain Development, Affect Regulation, and Infant Mental Health.” Infant Medical Health Journal 22: 7-66.

Shonkoff, Jack. National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, “The Timing and Quality of Early Experiences Combine to Shape Brain Architecture,” (working paper 5, Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, 2007), https://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/the-timing-and-quality-of-early-experiences-combine-to-shape-brain-architecture/, accessed August 11, 2018.

Tayler, C. 2015. “Learning in Early Childhood: Experiences, Relationships and ‘Learning to Be.” European Journal of Education 50(2): 160-174. https://www.researchconnections.org/childcare/resources/30086

Willoughby-Herb, Sara; Herb, Steven. Connecting Fathers, Children, and Reading. Neal-Schuman: NY. 2002.

Family & Community Engagement

Dunst, Carl. J. and Mary Beth Bruder. 1999. “Increasing Children’s Learning Opportunities in the Context of Family and Community Life.” Children’s Learning Opportunities Report 1, no. 1

Simon, Fran & Geoff Nixon. 2018.  “The Untapped Opportunity of Families as Collaborators: Taking Inspiration from New Zealand.” Exchange 40:6, 20-24.

Sonnenschein, S., & Sawyer, B. (2018, Eds.). Academic socialization of young Black
and Latino children: Building on family strengths. NY: Springer.

Van Voorhis, F.L., Maier, M., Epstein, J.L., & Lloyd, C.M. (2013). “The Impact of Family Involvement on the Education of Children Ages 3 to 8: A Focus on Literacy and Math Achievement Outcomes and Social-Emotional Skills. NY: MDRC. Accessed at: http://dev.mdrc.org/sites/default/files/The_Impact_of_Family_Involvement_FR.pdf

Multiple Intelligences  /  21st Century Skills

Armstrong, Thomas. 1999. 7 Kinds of Smart: Identifying and Developing Your Many Intelligences. New York: Plume.

Galinsky, Ellen. Mind in the Making: The Seven Essential Life Skills Every Child Needs (New York: HarperStudio, 2010).

Gardner, Howard. 1983. Multiple Intelligences: The Theory in Practice. New York: Basic Books.

Gardner, Howard. 2000. Intelligence Reframed: Multiple Intelligences for the 21st Century. New York: Basic Books.

Hirsh, Rae Ann. Early Childhood Curriculum: Incorporating Multiple Intelligences, Developmentally Appropriate Practice and Play. Boston, MA: Pearson. 2004.

Institute of Museum and Library Services (2009). Museums, Libraries, and 21st Century Skills (IMLS-2009-NAI-01). Washington, DC.

MI Oasis, “MI Intelligences,” http://multipleintelligencesoasis.org. accessed July 7, 2017.

Partnership for 21st Century Learning, “Framework for 21st Century Learning,” 2007, www.p21.0rg/our-work/p21-framework/. Last accessed August 11, 2018.

Digital Media

AAP Council on Communications and Media, “Media and Young Minds,” Pediatrics 138, no. 5 (2016).

Arnold, Johann Christoph. Endangered: Your Child in a Hostile World. New York: Plough Publishing, 2000.

Brooker, Liz, and John Siraj-Blatchford. “‘Click on Miaow!’: how children of three and four years experience the nursery computer.” Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood 3:2, 2002, p. 251-2783.

Brown, Ari, et. al. 2011. “American Academy of Pediatrics: Policy Statement: Media Use by Children Younger than 2 Years.” portal: Pediatrics 2011;128:1040–1045. doi; 10.1542/peds.2011-1753.

Campbell, Cen, Claudia Haines, Amy Koester, and Dorothy Stoltz, “Media Mentorship in Libraries Serving Youth,” Association for Library Service to Children, adopted March 11, 2015, www.ala.org/alsc/sites/ala.org.alsc/files/content/2015%20ALSC%20White%20Paper_FINAL.pdf.

Collen, Lauren. 2008. “Creative Ways to Use Digital Group Storytimes in the Classroom or Library.” http://laurencollen.com/Creative_Digital_Storytimes.pdf.

Collen, Lauren. 2006. “The Digital and Traditional Storytimes Research Project: Using Digitized Picture Books for Preschool Group Storytimes.” Children and Libraries, Winter 4, no. 3: 8-18.

Conner, Bobbi. Unplugged Play. New York: Workman Publishing, 2007.

Couse, Leslie J. and Dora W. Chen, “A Tablet Computer for Young Children? Exploring Its Viability for Early Childhood Education.” Journal of Research on Technology in Education 43:1, 2010

Cummins, June. 2004. “Accessing the International Children’s Digital Library.” Horn Book Magazine 80, No. 2 (March-April): 145-151.

Dancy, Rahima Baldwinl You Are Your Child’s First Teacher. Berkeley, CA: CelestialArts, 2000.

Dresang, Eliza T. “Digital Age Libraries and Youth: Learning Labs, Literacy Leaders, Radical Resources” in Jamshid Beheshti and Andrew Large’s The Information Behavior of a New Generation, (New York: Scarecrow, 2013).

Guernsey, Lisa. “How True Are Our Assumptions about Screen Time?,” NAEYC for Families, http://families.naeyc.org/learning-and-development/music-math-more/how-true-are-our-assumptions-about-screen-time/, accessed July 8, 2017.

Guernsey, L. (2012). Screen time: How electronic media from baby videos to educational software affects your young child. Hachette UK.

Guernsey, L., & Levine, M. H. (2015). Tap, click, read: Growing readers in a world of screens. John Wiley & Sons.

Haines, Claudia, Cen Campbell, ALSC, Becoming a Media Mentor: A Guide for Working with Children and Families (Chicago: ALA Editions, 2016)

Haugland, S.W. 1999. “What Role Should Technology Play in Young Children’s Learning? Young Children 55, no. 1, pp. 26-31.

Johnson, Steven. 2001. Emergence: The Connected Lives of Ants, Brains, Cities, and Software. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Long-Breipohl, Renate. 2001. “Computers in Early Childhood Education: A Jump Start for the Future?” Gateways Spring/Summer 40.

Mistry, K. B., et al. 2007. “Children’s Television Exposure and Behavioral and Social Outcomes at 5.5 Years: Does Timing of Exposure Matter?” portal: Pediatrics 2007: 762-769. doi: 10.1542/peds.2006-3573.

Molz, Redmond Kathleen, and Phyllis Dain. 1999. Civic Space/Cyberspace: The American Public Library in the Information Age. Cambridge: MIT.

NAEYC and the Fred Rogers Center. 2012. “Technology and Interactive Media as Tools in Early Childhood Programs Service Children from Birth through Age 8” p.2. http://www.naeyc.org/content/technology-and-young-children

Naidoo, Jamie Campbell. 2014. Diversity programming for digital youth: promoting cultural competence in the children’s library. Santa Barbara, California : Libraries Unlimited, Northrop, Laura & Erin Killeen. 2013 “A Framework for Using iPads to Build Early Literacy Skills.” The Reading Teachers 66:7, 531-537.

Northwest Territories Literary Council. TV Free From A to Z How-to-Kit: More Than 26 Fun Activities to Keep You Family Engaged and the TV Off! Canada: NWTLC. http://www.nwt.literacy.ca/resources/famlit/howtokit/tvfree/tvfree.pdf

Parish-Morris, Julia, Neha Mahajan, Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Roberta Michnick Golinkoff and Molly Fuller Collins, “Once Upon A Time: Parent-Child Dialogue and Storybook Reading in the Electronic Era,” Mind, Brain, and Education 7 no. 3 (2013):200-211. doi:10.1111/mbe.12028.

Reed, Jessica, Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, and Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, “Learning on Hold: Cell Phones Sidetrack Parent-Child Interactions,” Developmental Psychology 53, no. 8 (2017): 1428-1436.

Rideout, Victoria J., Elizabeth A. Vandewater, and Ellen A. Wartells. 2003. Electronic Media in the Lives of Infants, Toddlers, and Preschoolers (Fall).

Rogow, Faith. “Why Counting Screen Time Minutes Isn’t an Education Strategy.” Fred Rogers Center-Blog. Oct. 1, 2013. http://www.fredrogerscenter.org/blog/counting-screen-time-minutes-isnt-an-education-strategy

Roseberry, S., Hirsh‐Pasek, K., & Golinkoff, R. M. (2014). Skype me! Socially contingent interactions help toddlers learn language. Child development, 85(3), 956-970.

Zosh, Jennifer M., Sarah Roseberry Lytle, Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, and Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, “Putting the Education Back in Educational Apps: How Content and Context Interact to Promote Learning,” in Media Exposure During Infancy and Early Childhood, ed. Rachel Barr and Deborah Nichols Linebarger (New York: Springer International, 2017), 259–82.

Brain Research

Agarwal, Indu. (n.d.). “Early Brain and Child Development” PowerPoint presentation for the North Dakota Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. (February 2005) Available: www.healthychildcare.org/ppt_ccp.cfm

Alberta Family Wellness. How Brains are Built: The core story of brain development. Published online:  Oct. 18, 2013. Retrieved from YouTube.

Berger, A., Self-Regulation: Brain, cognition, and development. 2011, Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Bomba, P. C., Siqueland, E. R. 1983. “The Nature and Structure of Infant Form Categories.” Journal of Experimental Child Psychology 35, no. 2: 294-328.

Bornstein, M.H. 1989. “Sensitive Periods in Developments: Structural Characteristics and Casual Interpretations.” Psychological Bulletin 105, No. 2: 179-197.

Bruder, M. B. & Dunst, C. J. 1999-2000. “Expanding learning opportunities for infants and toddlers in natural environments: A chance to reconceptualize early intervention.” Zero to Three (December/January):34-36.

Bus, A. G., J. Belsky, M.H. van IJzendoorn, and K. Crnic. 1997. “Attachment and Bookreading Patterns: A Study of Mothers, Fathers, and their Toddlers.” Early Childhood Research Quarterly 12: 81-98.

Caine, Renate Nummela and Geoffrey Caine. 1990. Making Connections: Teaching and the Human Brain. Nashville, TN: Incentive.

Comery T.A.; Stamoudis C.X.; Irwin S.A.; Greenough W.T. 1996. “Increased Density of Multiple-Head Dendritic Spines on Medium-Sized Spiny Neurons of the Striatum in Rats Reared in a Complex Environment.” Neurobiology of Learning and Memory. (September) 66:2, 93-96.

Decasper, A.J. “Studying Learning in the Womb: Behavioral Scientists Are Using Established Experimental Methods to Show that Fetuses Can and Do Learn.”

DeCasper, Anthony J. and Melanie J. Spence. 1986. “Prenatal Maternal Speech Influences Newborns’ Perception of Speech Sounds.” Infant Behavior and Cognitive Neuroscience 14, No. 2: 199-209.

De Haan, Michelle, Olivier Pascalis, and Mark H. Johnson. 2002.  “Specialization of Neural Mechanisms Underlying Face Recognition in Human Infants.”  Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 14, No. 2: 199-209.

Dennison, Paul E., and Gail E. Dennison. 1992. Brain Gym: Simple Activities for Whole Brain Learning (Orange). Venture, CA: Edu Kinestheics.

Diamant-Cohen, Betsy, Ellen Riordan & Regina Wade. 2004. “Make Way for Dendrites: How Brain Research Can Impact Children’s Programming.” Children and Libraries (Spring): 12-20.

Diamant-Cohen, Betsy. 2004. “Mother Goose on the Loose: Applying Brain Research to Early Childhood Programs in the Public Library.” Public Libraries (January/February): 41- 45.

Diamant-Cohen, Betsy, and Saroj Nadkarni Ghoting. 2010. Early Literacy Kit: A Handbook and Tip Cards. Chicago: American Library Association.

DiePietro, Janet A. 2000. “Baby and the Brain.” Achieving School Readiness in Maryland Conference Proceedings 7 (December), Timonium, Maryland.

Dodge, T. D. & Heroman, C. (1996). Building your baby’s brain: A parent’s guide to the first five years. Washington, DC: Teaching Strategies, Inc.

Ellers, Fran.  (n.d.) “New research spurs debate on early brain development.  The Courier-Journal.  Available: www.courier-journal.com/cjextra/childcare/ day1_brain.html.

English, W.  1979.  “Brain Research and Music.”  Paper presented at the C.M.E.A., Vancouver, B.C.

Fotuhi, Maji. 2013. Boost Your Brain. New York: HarperCollins.

Gallagher, Kathleen Cranley. 2005. “Brain Research and Early Childhood Development.” Young Children (July): 12-20.

Gerhardt, S. (2004) Why Love Matters: how Affection Shapes a Baby’s Brain. Brunner-Routledge.

Geyer, Gessner. 2003. “The Optimal Brain.” Brain Energy: Optimal Learning. http://www.brainergy.com/.
Gomez, R. L. 2000. “Variability and Detection of Invariant Structure.” Psychological Science 13, no. 5: 431-436.

Golinkoff, R.M. & K. Hirsh-Pasek. 2016. Becoming Brilliant: What Science Tells Us About Raising Successful Children. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Gomez, R. L. 2000. “Variability and Detection of Invariant Structure.” Psychological Science 13, no. 5: 431-436.

Gopnik, Alison. 2011. Why Preschool Shouldn’t Be Like School. http://www.thinkfun.com/content/why-preschool-shouldnt-be-school.

Gopnik, Alison; Andrew N. Meltzoff, and Patricia K. Kuhl. 2001. The Scientist in the Crib: What Early Leaning Tells Us About the Mind. NY: Perennial.

Goren, Carolyn C., Merrill Sarty, Paul Y.K. Wu.  1975.  “Visual Following and Discrimination of Face-like Stimuli by Newborn Infants.”  Pediatrics 56, No. 4 (October): 544-549.

Greenough, W.T., J. E. Black, and C. Wallace. 1987. “Early experience and brain Development.” Child Development 58: 539-559.

Greenspan, Stanley. 1999.  Building Healthy Minds: The Six Experiences that create intelligence and emotional growth in babies and young children. Perseus Books.

Healy, Jane M. Your Child’s Growing Mind: A Practical Guide to Brain Development and Learning from Birth to Adolescence. New York: Broadway Books.

Higbee, Kenneth L.  2001.  Your Memory: How It Works and How to Improve It.  NY: Marlowe and Company.

Hutchison, Michael. 1987. Megabrain: New Tools and Techniques for Brain Growth New York: Ballantine.

Hutton, John S., Tzipi Horowitz-Kraus, Thomas DeWitt, Scott Holland. (2015) “Parent-child reading increases activation of brain networks supporting emergent literacy in 3-5 year-old children: An fMRI study. (doi: 10.1542/aapnews.20150425-4) http://www.abstracts2view.com/pas/view.php?nu=PAS15L1_1355.8.

Kandel, E. R., Schwartz, J. H., & Jessell, T. M. (Eds.). 2000. Principles of Neural Science (4th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.

Kosslyn, Stephen M., and Olivier Koenig. 1995. Wet Mind: The New Cognitive Neuroscience. NY: Free Press.

Krueger, Charlene, D. Holditch-Davis, S. Quint, A. DeCasper.  2004.  “Recurring Auditory Experience in the 28- to 34- Week Old Fetus.”  Infant Behavior and Development 27: 537-543.

Kuhl, Patricia K. “Brain Mechanisms in Early Language Acquisition.” Neuron 2010 September 9; 67(5): 713-727. doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2010.08.038.

Landry, Susan H., Paul R. Swank, Karen E. Smith, Michael A. Assel, and Susan B. Gunnewig. 2006. “Enhancing Early Literacy Skills for Preschool Children: Bringing a Professional Development Model to Scale.” J Learn Disabil 30, no. 4: 306-324.

MacLean, Paul. 1973. A Triune Concept of the Brain and Behavior. Toronto: the Ontario Mental Health Foundation by University of Toronto Press.

MacLean, Paul E. 1990. The Triune Brain in Evolution: Role in Paleocerebral Functions. New York: Plenum Press.

Marjanovič-Umek, L., Fekonja-Peklaj, U., & Podlesek, A. 2013. “The effect of parental involvement and encouragement on preschool children’s symbolic play.” Early Child Development and Care, 1-14.

Meaney, M.J.  2001.  “Maternal Care, Gene Expression, and the Transmission of Individual Differences in Stress Reactivity Across Generations.”  Annual Review of Neuroscience 24: 1161-1192.

Meltzoff, Andrew N., and M. Keith Moore. “Newborn infants imitate adult facial gestures.” Child development (1983): 702-709.

Mondloch, C.L., Terri L. Lewis, D. Robert Budreau, Daphne Maurer, James L. Dannemiller, Benjamin R. Stephens, and Kathleen A. Kleiner-Gathercoal.  1999.  “Face Perception During Early Infancy.”  Psychological Science 10, No. 5 (September): 419.

National Research Council. 2000. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School. Expended ed. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

Panksepp, Jaak, Jeff Burgdorf, Cortney Turner, and Nakia Gordon.  2003.  “Modeling ADHD-type Arousal with Unilateral Frontal Cortex Damage in Rats and Beneficial Effects of Play Therapy.”  Brain and Cognition 52, No. 1 (June):97-105.

Porter, Phyllis. 2003. “Early Brain Development: What Parents and Caregiver Need To Know.” Educarer. Available: www.educarer.com/brain.htm.

Puckett, Margaret, Carol Sue Marshall, and Ruth Davis. 1999. “Examining the Emergence of Brain Development Research: The Promises and Perils.” Childhood Education (Fall):8-12.

Ratey, John. 2002. User’s Guide to the Brain: Perception, Attention, and the Four Theatres of the Brain. NY: Vintage.

Restak, Richard M. 1984. The Brain. NY: Bantam Books.

Restak, Richard M. 1986. The Infant Mind. Garden City, NY: Doubleday.

Richardson, Ann. 1999. “Building a Bridge: Finding a Firm Footing for Brain-Based Learning.” Georgie Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development

Rintoul, Betty, “Encouraging Connections” (presentation, Learning by Heart: Emotional Intelligence and School Readiness Conference, Linthicum, Maryland, May 26, 2004).

Rushton, Stephen P., J. Eitelgeorge, and R. Zickafoose. 2003. “Connecting Brian Cambourne’s Conditions of Learning Theory to Brain/Mind Principles: Implications for Early Childhood Educators.” Early Childhood Education Journal 31, No. 1 (Fall): 11-21.

Sapolsky, Robert. 2004. Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers. 3rd edition. MacMillan.

Schore, A. 2001.  “Effects of Secure Attachment on Right Brain Development, Affect Regulation, and Infant Mental Health.”  Infant Medical Health Journal 22: 7-66.

Schore, A.N. 2005. “Attachment, Affect Regulation, and the Developing Right Brain: Linking Developmental Neuroscience to Pediatrics.” Pediatrics in Review 26 (6): 204–17.

Schore, A.N. 2000. “Attachment and the Regulation of the Right Brain.” Attachment and Human Development 2 (1): 23–47

Siegel, D.J. 2012. The Developing Mind: How Relationships and the Brain Interact to Shape Who We Are. New York: Guilford.

Shiller, P. (2001). Brain Research and Its Implications for Early Childhood Programs — Applying Research to Our Work. Exchange, 140, 14-19.

Suomi, S. J. 1991.  “Early Stress and Adult Emotional Reactivity in Rhesus Monkeys.”  In  The Childhood Environment and Adult Disease edited by G.R. Bock and J. Whelan.  Chichester, England: John Wiley & Sons.

Sylwester, Robert. 1995. A Celebration of Neurons: An Educator’s Guide to the Human Brain. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Library Programming for Young Children

Bromann, Jennifer. 2003. Storytime Action! New York: Neal-Schuman.

Campana, Kathleen, J. Elizabeth Mills, Janet L. Capps, Eliza T. Dresang, Allyson Carlyle, Cheryl A. Metoyer, Ivette Bayo Urban, Erika N. Feldman, Marin Brouwer, Kathleen Burnett, and Bowie Kotrla. (2016) “Early Literacy in Library Storytimes: A Study of Measures of Effectiveness,” Library Quarterly: Information, Community, Policy, vol. 86, no. 4, pp. 369–388. © 2016

Fader, Ellen. 2003. “How Storytimes for Preschool Children Can Incorporate Current Research.” https://www.ala.org/ala/pla/plaissues/earlylit/storytimeapp/plastfader.pdfhttps://www.ala.org/ala/pla/plaissues/earlylit/storytimeapp/plastfader.pdf

Grabarek, Kristin and Mary R. Lanni. 2018. Early Learning Through Play: Library Programming for Diverse Communities. Libraries Unlimited.

Goulding, Anne; Dickie, John; Shuker Mary Jane; Bennett, Lauren. 2-14. “New Zealand’s Public Libraries and Early Literacy,” from LIANZA Conference 2014, 12-15 October, Auckland, New Zealand. Pou Whakairo: Connect and Thrive. P. 1-12.

Goulding, Anne & Amanda Crump (2017) Developing Inquiring Minds: Public Library Programming for Babies in Aotearoa New Zealand, Public Library Quarterly, 36:1, 26-42, DOI: 10.1080/01616846.2017.1275600 To link to this article: https://doi.org/10.1080/01616846.2017.127560

Goulding, Anne, John Dickieb, Mary Jane Shuker. 2017. “Observing preschool storytime practices in Aotearoa New Zealand’s urban public libraries,” Library and Information Science Research 39 (2017), 199-212.

Grammatikopoulos, V., A. Gregoriadis, and E. Zachopoulou. (2015) “Evaluation of Early Childhood Education Environments and Professional Development: Current Practices and Implications. (Chapter 7 in Contemporary Perspectives on Research in Assessment and Evaluation in Early Childhood Education. Information Age Publishing, p. 153-169.)

Libertus, K., & Landa, R. J. (2013). The Early Motor Questionnaire (EMQ): A parental report measure of early motor development. Infant Behavior and Development, 36(4), 833-842.

McKechnie, L. (2000). Ethnographic observation of preschool children. Library & Information Science Research22(1), 61-76.

McKechnie, Lynne. (E.F.) 2006. “Observations of Babies and Toddlers in Library Settings,” LIBRARY TRENDS, Vol. 55, No. 1, Summer 2006 (“Research Methods,” edited by Lynda M. Baker), pp. 190–201.

Mills, J. Elizabeth, Kathleen Campana, Allyson Carlyle, Bowie Kotrla, Eliza T. Dresang, Ivette Bayo Urban, Janet L. Capps, Cheryl Metoyer, Erika N. Feldman, Marin Brouwer, and Kathleen Burnett. (2018) “Early Literacy in Library Storytimes, Part 2: A Quasi-Experimental Study and Intervention with Children’s Storytime Providers,” Library Quarterly: Information, Community, Policy, vol. 88, no. 2, pp. 160–176.

National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) and the National Association of Early Childhood Specialists in State Departments of Education (NAECS/SDE), 2003. Position Statement: “Early Childhood curriculum, Assessment, and Program Evaluation.: Building an Effective Accountable system in Programs for children Birth through Age 8.”

Research and Evaluation

Annie E. Casey Foundation. 2004. Kids Count Data Book: Moving Youth from Risk to Opportunity. Baltimore: The Annie E. Casey Foundation.

Campana, J. Kathleen, Elizabeth Mills, and Saroj Nadkarni Ghoting, Supercharged Storytimes (Chicago: ALA Editions, 2016).  NOTE: VPT can be found online at VIEWS2: Valuable Initiatives in Early Learning That Work Successfully, “Resources,” http://views2.ischool.uw.edu/resources/, accessed July 27, 2017.

Dowd, Frances Smardo. “Evaluating the Impact of Public Library Storytime Programs Upon the Emergent Literacy of Preschoolers: A Call for Research,” Public Libraries 3, no. 6 (1997): 348-51.

Dresang, Eliza T., Melissa Gross, and Leslie Edmonds Holt. “Project CATE: Using outcome measure to assess school-age children’s use of technology in urban public libraries. A collaborative research process.” Library and Information Science Research 25, no. 1, 19-42.

Fader, Ellen. “How Storytimes for Preschool Children Can Incorporate Research,” OLA Quarterly 8, no. 3, (2014): 14 & 19.

Lesher, Crystal, and Kate Moser. 2004. Mother Goose on the Loose Program Evaluation Report. (May) Class assignment for a class at the University of Baltimore.

Libertus, K.,andLanda,R.J.(2013).The Early Motor Questionnaire (EMQ):a parental report measure of early motor development. InfantBehav.Dev. 36, 833–842. doi:10.1016/j.infbeh.2013.09.007

McKechnie, Lynne (E.F.). 2000. “Ethnographic Observation of Preschool Children.” Library & Information Science Research 22, No. 1: 61-76.

McKechnie, Lynne (E.F.). 2006. “Observations of Babies and Toddlers in Library Settings.” Library Trends 55, No.1, Summer 2006: 190-201.

Neuman Susan and Donna Celano. 2010. An Evaluation of Every Child Ready to Read: A Parent Initiative.

Pace, A., M. Alper, R. Burchinal, R. M. Golinkoff, & K. Hirsh-Pasek. 2018. “Measuring Success: Within and Cross-domain Predictors of Academic and Social Trajectories in Elementary School.” Early Childhood Research Quarterly

Raver, C. Cybele and Edward F. Zigler. 2007. “Another Step Back? Assessing Readiness in Head Start.” Journal of the National Association for the Education of Young Children January 2004.

Walter, Virginia A. Output measures for public library service to children: A manual of standardized procedures (Chicago: American Library Association, 1992).

Walter,  Virginia A. “Evaluating Library Services and Programs.” In Kathleen Staerkel, Mary Fellows, and Sue Nespeca, editors, Youth Services Librarians as Managers: A How-To-Guide from Budgeting to Personnel, (Chicago: American Library Association, 1995).

Walter, Virginia A. “Public library service to children and teens: A research agenda,” Library Trends 51, no. 4 (2003): 571-89 and Twenty First Century Kids, Twenty First Century Librarians (Chicago: American Library Association, 2009).

Children’s Librarians and Children’s Programming

Bauer, Caroline Feller. This Way to Books. H. W. Wilson, 1983.

Bauer, Caroline Feller, and Lynn G. Bredeson. 1993. Caroline Feller Bauer’s New Handbook for Storytellers: With Stories, Poems, Magic, and More. Chicago: American Library Association.

Campana, Kathleen J., Elizabeth Mills, and Saroj Nadkarni Ghoting, Supercharged Storytimes: An Early Literacy Planning and Assessment Guide (Chicago: ALA Editions, 2016).

Castellano, Marie. 2003. Simply Super Storytimes: Programming Ideas for Ages 3-6. Fort Atkinson, WI: Upstart Books.

Cobb, Jane. I’m a Little Teapot! Presenting Preschool Storytime. Vancouver, British Columbia: Black Sheep Press, 1996.

Diamant, Betsy. “The Library as an Institution for Social Change: Social Growth and Development of Children Through Utilization of Library Programs.” Senior Thesis. Brandeis University, 1980, 42.

Diamant-Cohen, Betsy. Preschool Programming Packet. Baltimore, MD: Enoch Pratt Free Library, 2007

Diamant-Cohen, Betsy and Melanie A. Hetrick. Transforming Preschool Storytime: A Modern Vision and a Year of Programs. (Chicago: ALA Neal Schuman, 2013).

Garrison, Dee. Apostles of Culture: The Public Librarian and American Society, 1876-1920. University of Wisconsin Press, 2003.

Greene, Ellin. 1991. Books, Babies, and Libraries: Serving Infants and Their Parents and Caregivers. Chicago: ALA.

Greenfield, Judith C. 1985. Patterns for Preschoolers: Programs and Services for Young Children in Public Libraries. New York: New York Library Association. New York: New York Library Association, Youth Services Section.

Harris, Pam and Pamela J. McKenzie. 2004. “What it Means to Be “In-Between”: A Focus Group Analysis of Barriers Faced by Children Aged 7 to 11 Using Public Libraries.” The Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science 28, no. 4: 3-24.

Hayden, Carla. 2003. “What are Libraries For?” American Libraries (November): 5.
Hughes, K. 2004. “PLA Early Literacy Research Demonstrates That Libraries Do Make a Difference.” Public Libraries 43, no. 1: 58.

Hughes, K. 2004. “PLA Early Literacy Research Demonstrates That Libraries Do Make a Difference.” Public Libraries 43, no. 1: 58.

Jenkins, Christine A. 2000. “The History of Youth Services Librarianship: A Review of the Research Literature.” Libraries & Culture (Winter) 35, No. 1: 104-

Jones, Taffy. 1989. Library Programs for Children. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Co.

Marino, Jane. 2003. Babies in the Library! Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press.

Marino, Jane. 1999. What Works: Developmentally Appropriate Library Programs for Very Young Children. Albany, New York: Youth Services Section, New York Library Association.

Martinez, G. 2007. “Partnering for Reading Readiness: A Case Study of Maryland Public Librarians.” Children and Libraries 5, no. 1: 32-39.

McKechnie, Lynne (E.F.). 1999. “Patricia Spereman and the Beginning of Canadian Public Library Work with Children.” Libraries & Culture 34, No. 2: 135-150.

Nespeca, Sue McLeaf. 1994. Library Programming for Families with Young Children. New York: Neal-Schuman.

Nichols, Judy. 1998. Storytimes for Two-Year Olds. Chicago: American Library Association.
Ramos, Francisco, and Stephen Krashen. 1998. “The Impact of One Trip to the Public Library: Making Books Available May Be the Best Incentive for Reading.” Reading Teacher No. 7: 614-615.

Raines, Shirley, and Robert J. Canady. Story S-t-r-e-t-c-h-e-r-s: Activities to Expand Children’s Favorite Books. Beltsville, MD: Gryphon House, 1989.

Ramos, Francisco, and Stephen Krashen.  1998.  “The Impact of One Trip to the Public Library: Making Books Available May Be the Best Incentive for Reading.” Reading Teacher No. 7: 614-615.

Reid, Rob. 1999. Family Storytime: Twenty-Four Creative Programs for All Ages. Chicago: American Library Association.

Reid, Rob.  2007. Children’s Jukebox: The Select Subject Guide to Children’s Musical Recordings. Chicago: American Library Association.

Reid, Rob. 2009. Children’s Jukebox. Chicago: American Library Association.

Reid, Rob. 2003. Something Funny Happened at the Library: How to Create Humorous Programs for Children and Young Adults. Chicago: American Library Association.

Reid, Rob.  2009. Something Musical Happened at the Library: Adding Song and Dance to Children’s Story Programs. Chicago: American Library Association.

Reid, Rob (author) and Nadine Bernard Westcott (illustrator). 2009. Comin’ Down to Storytime. Janesville, WI: Upstart Books.

Reif, K. 2000. “Are Public Libraries the Preschooler’s Door to Learning?” Public Libraries 39, no. 5: 262-268.

Snow, Sharon. 2007. Building Blocks: Building a Parent-Child Literacy Program at Your Library. Libraries Unlimited.

Teale, William H. 1999. “Libraries Promote Early Literacy Learning: Ideas From Current Research and Early Childhood Programs.” Journal of Youth Services in Libraries No. 3: 9-16.

Walter, Virginia. 2001. Children & Libraries: Getting it Right. Chicago: ALA.

Zmuda, Allison, and Violet H. Harada. 2008. Librarians as Learning Specialists: Meeting the Learning Imperative for the 21st Century. Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited.

Nursery Rhymes

Bennett, P. (2010). Rhyme play: Playing with children and mother goose. Van Nuys, CA: Alfred Publishing.

Bland, Janice. “Grammar Templates with Poetry for Children.” Teaching English to Young Learners: Critical Issues in Language Teaching with 3-12 Year Olds. London and New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2015. 147-66. Print.

Bradley, L. and Bryant, P.E. 1983. “Categorising sounds and learning to read. Nature 301: 419-421. – demonstrated the strong link between knowledge of nursery rhymes and aspects of learning how to read.

Bradley, L. and Bryant, P.E. 1985. Children’s Reading Problems. Oxford: Blackwells. – demonstrated the strong link between knowledge of nursery rhymes and aspects of learning how to read.

Bryant, Peter. “Sensitivity to onset and rhyme does predict young children’s reading: a comment on Muter, Hulme, Snowling, and Taylor (1997).” Journal of Experimental Child Psychology 71.1 (1998): 29-37.

“Muter, Hulme, Snowling, and Taylor (1997) claimed that measures of phoneme segmentation, and not measures of rhyme, predict young children’s reading. They base this claim on the relative predictive success of two rhyme and two phoneme segmentation tasks. However, there is a problem with one of their two rhyme measures, the Rhyme Detection measure. The children were asked to select a choice word which “rhymes with or sounds like” a target word, but the authors only scored rhyme choices (“boat”–“coat”) as correct. Choices of words with the same onset as the target (“train”–“tractor”) were counted as mistakes, even though these latter choices also shared a common sound with the target. A better way to score the task is to count onset as well as rhyme choices as correct. The new score predicts reading and spelling as well as the phoneme tasks. This result is consistent with the hypothesis of Goswami and Bryant (1990) that sensitivity to onset and rhyme, as well as awareness of phonemes, plays a part in children’s success in reading and to spelling.”

Bryant, P.D., M. MacLean, L. Bradley, & J. Crossland. 1990. “Rhyme and Alliteration, Phoneme Detection, and Learning to Read.” Developmental Psychology 26:3, 429-438.

Bryant, P. E., L. Bradley, M. Maclean, and J. Crossland. “Nursery Rhymes, Phonological Skills and Reading.” J. Child Lang. Journal of Child Language 16.02 (1989): 407. Web. “Nursery rhymes are an almost universal part of young English-speaking children’s lives. We have already established that there are strong links between children’s early knowledge of nursery rhymes at 3;3 and their developing phonological skills over the next year and a quarter. Since such skills are known to be related to children’s success in learning to read, this result suggests the hypothesis that acquaintance with nursery rhymes might also affect children’s reading. We now report longitudinal data from a group of 64 children from the age of 3;4 to 6;3 which support this hypothesis. There is a strong relation between early knowledge of nursery rhymes and success in reading and spelling over the next three years even after differences in social background, I.Q and the children’s phonological skills at the start of the project are taken into account. This raises the question of how nursery rhymes have such an effect. Our answer is that knowledge of nursery rhymes enhances children’s phonological sensitivity which in turn helps them to learn to read. This paper presents further analyses which support the idea of this path from nursery rhymes to reading. Nursery rhymes are related to the child’s subsequent sensitivity to rhyme and phonemes. Moreover the connection between knowledge of nursery rhymes and reading and spelling ability disappears when controls are made for differences in these subsequent phonological skills.”

Bryant, P. E., L. Bradley, M. Maclean, and J. Crossland. 1990. “Rhyme and alliteration, phoneme detection and learning to read. Developmental Psychology 26:3, 429-438.

Bryant, P., & Goswami, U. (2016). Phonological skills and learning to read. Routledge.

Cardany, Audrey Berger. “Nursery rhymes in music and language literacy.”General Music Today (2012): 1048371312462869.
Nursery rhymes have been a part of childhood for centuries. Spanning the generations, children and adults continue to delight in their poetry and melodies. Educators consider these rhymes traditional literature for music and language instruction. Within this article, the author includes a brief historical discussion of nursery rhymes and writes contemporary music lessons for young children using traditional English verse./

Clay. M. (1990). Eggheads vote Humpty a winner. Speld News, 5.

Cook, G. “Language Play, Language Learning.” ELT Journal 51.3 (1997): 224-31. Web.

DeCastro, Amy, and Jennifer Kern. Teaching Language Arts through Nursery Rhymes. Westminster, CA: Teacher Created Materials, 2001. Print.

Delamar, G. (1987). Mother Goose from Nursery to Literature. Jefferson, NC: McFarland. – talks about ‘the importance for these verses as part of early school training).

Dickerson, Constance. “The Preschool Literacy and You (PLAY) Room: Creating an Early Literacy Play in Your Library.” Children and Libraries Spring 2012, 11-15.

Dickinson, David K., et al. “The comprehensive language approach to early literacy: The interrelationships among vocabulary, phonological sensitivity, and print knowledge among preschool-aged children.” Journal of Educational Psychology 95.3 (2003): 465.

Dunst, C., Meter, D., & Hamby, D. W. (2011). Relationship between young children’s nursery rhyme experiences and knowledge and phonological and print-related abilities. Center for Early Literacy Learning, 4(1), 1-12. http://www.earlyliteracylearning.org/cellreviews/cellreviews_v4_n1.pdf

Ezell, H. K., & Justice, L. M. (2005). Shared storybook reading: Building young children’s language & emergent literacy skills. PH Brookes Pub..Factor, J. 1988. Captain Cook Chased a Chook. Melbourne: Penguin.

Factor, J. 1988. Captain Cook Chased a Chook. Melbourne: Penguin.

Feierabend, John. “Music in Early Childhood.” Design For Arts in Education 91, no. 6 (1990): 15-20. doi:10.1080/07320973.1990.9934833.

Fernandez-Fein, S., & Baker, L. (1997). Rhyme and alliteration sensitivity and relevant experiences among preschoolers from diverse backgrounds. Journal of Literacy Research, 29(3), 433-459.

Gerry, David, Andrea Unrau, and Laurel J. Trainor. “Active music classes in infancy enhance musical, communicative and social development.” Developmental Science (2012).

Goswami, U. (1999). Causal connections in beginning reading: The importance of rhyme. Journal of Research in Reading, 22(3), 217-240.

Goswami, U. (2001). Early phonological development and the acquisition of literacy. Handbook of early literacy research, 1, 111-125.

Griffith, Kathlyn. “NURSERY RHYMES: Everything old is new again.” In: Thinking Through the Arts by Wendy Schiller, (2000): 86-95. https://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=vmiPAgAAQBAJ&oi=fnd&pg=PA86&ots=6fyE-t-wHi&sig=NzevNWRAhM6Lw6YPxtAxcDc5H5g#v=onepage&q&f=false

Hall, Dorothy P. and Patricia M. Cunningham. 1997. Month-By-Month Reading and Writing for Kindergarten: Systematic, Multilevel Instruction. Greensboro, NC: Carson-Dellosa Publishing.
Many parents and teachers of young children use the nursery rhymes to introduce children to rhythm and rhyme. The nursery rhyme characters become old and familiar friends. Why not help children use their love and knowledge of the nursery rhymes to grow as readers and writers? In Month-By-Month Reading and Writing for Kindergarten, Dorothy Hall and Patricia Cunningham share these benefits of using rhymes: “Rhyming activities develop one of the most critical concepts for success in beginning reading-phonemic awareness.” (24)

Halliwell, James Orchard, and W. B. Scott. The Nursery Rhymes of England. London and New York: Frederick Warne and, 1886.
This is a digitized copy of the original book, found at: https://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=0jcDAAAAYAAJ&oi=fnd&pg=PA196&dq=nursery+rhymes++&ots=Re0yH9mURT&sig=afBD-AmSkOPM_PqvuPRsSURrxc4#v=onepage&q=nursery%20rhymes&f=false

Hamner, D. “Growing Readers and Writers with Help from Mother Goose – ReadWriteThink.” Readwritethink.org. NCTE, 2003. Web. 21 July 2015.

Harper, L. J. (2011). Nursery rhyme knowledge and phonological awareness in preschool children. The Journal of Language and Literacy Education, 7(1), 63-78. Phonological awareness is an important precursor in learning to read. This awareness of phonemes fosters a child’s ability to hear and blend sounds, encode and decode words, and to spell phonetically. This quantitative study assessed pre-K children’s existing Euro-American nursery rhyme knowledge and phonological awareness literacy, provided phonological awareness training with an experimental group of children and investigated the effects of explicit nursery rhyme instruction on participants’ phonemic skill levels. These data reveal that children exposed to the intervention consisting of explicit Euro-American nursery rhyme instruction significantly outperformed the children in the control group on rhyme awareness and completion statement measures. Results of this research suggest that knowledge of nursery rhymes enhances children’s phonological awareness and sensitivity to individual phonemes and rhyme, and stimulates phonemic skill development.http://jolle.coe.uga.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/7_1_5_harper.pdf

Juel, C., & Minden-Cupp, C. (1999/2000). One down and 80,000 to go: Word recognition instruction in the primary grades. The Reading Teacher, 53, 332–335.
Children benefit from both direct phonics instruction and the reading and discussion of texts.
Children entering first grade with minimal reading skill seem to have the greatest success with the following practices: modeling of chunking, sounding, and blending, comparing and contrasting words sounds and spelling patterns, and small group lessons.

Johnston, R. S., Anderson, M., & Holligan, C. (1996). Knowledge of the alphabet and explicit awareness of phonemes in pre-readers: The nature of the relationship. Reading and writing, 8(3), 217-234.

Johnson, J. L., & Hayes, D. S. (1987). Preschool children’s retention of rhyming and nonrhyming text: Paraphrase and rote recitation measures.Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 8(3), 317-327.
In this study, we sought to clarify the effect that rhyme has on young children’s short-term retention of story narratives. Sixty-four preschool children were read rhymed or nonrhyming versions of a short story where the semantic content differed only in the arrangement of lines across test stanzas. For each type of narrative, one half of the subjects attempted rote recitation of exact study language. The remaining subjects were asked to paraphrase semantic content. Analyses revealed that rhyme enhanced word-for-word recitation in correct sequential order, whereas nonrhyming presentations evoked initial facilitation of semantic paraphrase. The findings are discussed in terms of transfer-appropriate and levels-of-processing memory models.

Kenney, Susan. “Nursery Rhymes: Foundation for Learning.” General Music Today 19.1 (2005): 28-31.
The article considers nursery rhymes as the foundation for learning. It is said that nursery rhymes carry all the parts of language that lead to speaking and reading. Because rhymes are short, they are easy for children to repeat, and become some of the first sentences children utter. The rhymes expand vocabulary, exposing children to words they may not hear in everyday language. Most important to music educators is the fact that nursery rhymes prepare young children for future music study.

Lefebvre, P., Bolduc, J., & Pirkenne, C. (2015). Pilot Study on Kindergarten Teachers’ Perception of Linguistic and Musical Challenges in Nursery Rhymes. Journal for Learning through the Arts: A Research Journal on Arts Integration in Schools and Communities, 11(1).
According to Ezell and Justice (2005), by putting more emphasis on easier nursery rhymes, teachers might target only what children have already mastered, leaving less opportunity for new emergent literacy and music skills to develop. The results point to the necessity of improving educators’ training in regard to the use of nursery rhymes by focusing on the educational opportunities provided by linguistic and musical challenges in nursery rhymes, an important starting point for explicit instruction and scaffolding (Bruner, 1983).

Lerer, Seth. Children’s Literature: A Reader’s History, from Aesop to Harry Potter. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008.

Lukens, R. (1995) A Critical handbook of Children’s Literature (5th ed), New York: HarperCollins. -sees nursery rhymes as a viable precursor to the study of poetry

Lundberg, I., Frost, J., & Petersen, O. P. (1988). Effects of an extensive program for stimulating phonological awareness in preschool children. Reading research quarterly, 263-284.

Lynn, Joanne L. “Runes to ward off sorrow: rhetoric of the English nursery rhyme.” Children’s Literature in Education 16.1 (1985): 3-14.

MacLean, Morag, Peter Bryant, and Lynette Bradley, “Rhymes, Nursery Rhymes, and Reading in Early Childhood,” Merrill-Palmer Quarterly 33, no. 3 (1987): 255–81.
Reports a strong, highly specific relationship between young children’s knowledge of nursery rhymes and the development of phonological skills, which remained significant when differences in IQ and social background were controlled. Measures of nursery rhymes and alliteration were related to early reading skills. (Author/NH) study was longitudinal, starting when the children were 3 years old.

Monro, F. (Senior Speech-Language Pathologist). Nursery rhymes, songs and early language development. Interior Health Authority

Nazzi, Bertoncini, & Mehler (1998). Language discrimination by newborns: Toward an
Understanding of the role of rhythm. ‘Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human
Perception and Performance, 24 (3): 756-766.

Neuman, S. B. (2004). Learning from poems & rhymes. Scholastic Parent & Child, 12 (3), 32.

Nodelman, P. (1996) The Pleasures of Children’s Literature (2nd ed) New York: Longman.– explores explore the otential of nursery rhymes in psycholalyntical terms

Opie, I, and Opie P. (eds) 1980. The Oxford Dictionary of Nursery rhymes. Oxford: Oxfored University Press– have enlightened all with their comprehensive research into heir origins and place in history and development of children’s literature.

Partridge, Susan. “Nursery Rhymes, a Pathway to Reading?.” (1992).
Children’s knowledge of nursery rhymes can be their path to learning to read and to enjoy reading if handled properly by their teachers and parents. Each session with a child or group of children must be enjoyable, non-threatening, inspiring and challenging for the children. They should be able to feel that their parents and teachers are also enjoying the rhymes, not just helping them because they feel it is their duty to do so. The use of nursery rhymes as a pathway for children’s learning to read might be the answer to the present concern, the use of whole word versus decoding skills in teaching children to read, for the use of rhyme provides for both. Furthermore, since children like rhymes, they discover from the onset that reading can provide much pleasure. The also learn that the help they get in decoding and the discoveries they themselves make add to their enjoyment of rhymes. (A list of 12 instructional implications is included.) (RS)

Paulsen, Kara. The Effects of Nursery Rhymes on the Acquisition of Beginning Reading Skills by Emerging Readers. Cedar Rapids: Graceland U, 2008. Print.

Prošić-Santovac, Danijela. “Making the Match: Traditional Nursery Rhymes and Teaching English to Modern Children.” Making the Match: Traditional Nursery Rhymes and Teaching English to Modern Children. Children’s Literature in English Language Education (CLELEjournal), 2015. Web. 21 July 2015.
Nursery rhymes have been used in teaching English to children for a long time and for a variety of reasons, including linguistic, cognitive, affective, and cultural ones. However, because many rhymes were created more than a hundred years ago, when society cherished somewhat different values from those in the modern day, care should be exercised when choosing the rhymes to be used in teaching modern-day children.

Pullen, P. C., & Justice, L. M. (2003). Enhancing phonological awareness, print awareness, and oral language skills in preschool children. Intervention in school and clinic, 39(2), 87-98.
The preschool years are critical to the development of emergent literacy skills that will ensure a smooth transition into formal reading. Phonological awareness, print awareness, and oral language development are three areas associated with emergent literacy that play a crucial role in the acquisition of reading. This article presents an overview of these critical components of emergent literacy. The overview includes a brief review of recent research and provides strategies for developing phonological awareness, print awareness, and oral language in the preschool classroom.

Reichertz, Ronald. “The Generative Power of Nursery Rhymes.” Children’s Literature Association Quarterly 19.3 (1994): 100-104. http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/chq/summary/v019/19.3.reichertz.html

Reilly, V., and S. Ward. Very Young Learners. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2003. Print.

Rollin, L. (1992). Cradle and All: A cultural and Psychoanalytic Reading. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi. – explores the potential of nursery rhymes in cultural and analytic terms.

Shilling, Wynne A. “Mathematics, Music and Movement: Exploring Concepts and Connections.” Early Childhood Education Journal 29, no. 3 (Spring 2002): 179-84. doi:10.1023/A:1014536625850.
“The rhythmical components of music with its accompanying speech afford rich opportunities for exploring mathematical concepts through experiences with beat, meter, duration of sounds, rhythmic patterns, and tempo.” Includes musical activities that have embedded mathematics.

Sizer, Michael. “The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes.” PBS. Accessed July 23, 2015. http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/reading-language/reading-tips/the-surprising-meaning-and-benefits-of-nursery-rhymes/.

Vandergrif, Kay E. “A Diller, A Dollar.” ECLIPSE. Accessed July 23, 2015. https://web.archive.org/web/20101113191401/http://eclipse.rutgers.edu/goose/rhymes/adad/.

Whitehead, M. (1993). Born again phonics and nursery rhyme revival. English in Education 27:3, 42-51.

Nursery Rhyme BLOGS and webpages:

Inclusive Practices

Banks, Carrie Scott; Sandra Feinberg, Barbara A. Jordan, Kathleen Deerr, Michelle Langa. 2014. Including Families of Children with Special Needs: A How-To-Do-It Manual for Librarians. Chicago: ALA Neal-Schuman.

Burgstahler, Sheryl. “A Checklist for Making Libraries Welcoming, Accessible, and Usable.” Equal Access: Universal Design of Libraries. http://www.washington.edu/doit/equal-access-universal-design-libraries

Burke, J. (2012). Children at play: Can i play too? In S. J. Lane, & A. C. Bundy (Eds.) Kids can be kids: A childhood occupations approach (pp. 28-43). Philadelphia: F. A. Davis.

Campbell, Monica L., Shawnna Helf, and Nancy L. Cooke. “Effects of adding multisensory components to a supplemental reading program on the decoding skills of treatment resisters.” Education and Treatment of Children 31, no. 3 (2008): 267-295

Diamant-Cohen, Betsy. Early Literacy Programming en Español (Chicago: Neal-Schuman / ALA, 2010). https://www.alastore.ala.org/content/early-literacy-programming-en-espa%C3%B1ol-mother-goose-loose%C2%AE-programs-bilingual-learners.

Diamant-Cohen, Betsy, Tess Prendergast, Christy Estrovitz, Carrie Banks, and Kim Van der Veen.  “We Play Here! Bringing the Power of Play Into Children’s Libraries.”  Children and Libraries 10:1(2012): 3-10, 52.

Harman, Teri. “Tips for Reading to Children with Special Needs | KSL.com.”Tips for Reading to Children with Special Needs | KSL.com. KSL.com, n.d. Web. 18 Dec. 2015. https://www.ksl.com/?sid=22953662

Harris, Alyson. “Visual Supports for Students with Autism.” New Horizons for Learning 10, no. 2 (2012). http://education.jhu.edu/PD/newhorizons/Journals/specialedjournal/Harris.

Johnson, S.S., A.P. McDonnell. N, and S. Hawken. 2008. “Enhancing Outcomes in Early Literacy for Young Children with Disabilities: Strategies for Success. Intervention in School and Clinic 43(4): 210-217.

Lloyd, M., MacDonald, M., and Lord, C.(2013).Motor skills of toddlers with autism spectrum disorders. Autism 17, 133–146.doi: 10.1177/1362361311402230

Maryland State Department of Education/Division of Special Education and Early Intervention Services and The Maryland Committee for Children. 2003. Think Tank. No. 3 (Fall).

MacMillan, Kathy. 2006. Try Your Hand At This: Easy Ways to Incorporate Sign Language Into Your Programs. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press.

MacMillan, Kathy. 2013. Little Hands and Big Hands: Children and Adults Signing Together. Chicago: Huron Street Press

Naidoo, Jamie Campbell. 2014. Diversity programming for digital youth: promoting cultural competence in the children’s library. Santa Barbara, California : Libraries Unlimited.

Naidoo, Jamie Campbell, and Katie Scherrer. 2016. Once Upon a Cuento: Bilingual Storytimes in English and Spanish. Chicago: ALA Editions.

Prendergast. Tess and Rhea Lazar. “Language Fun Storytime: Serving children with Speech and Language Delays.” In Betsy Diamant-Cohen’s (ed.) Children’s Services: Partnerships for Success. (Chicago: American Library Association, 2010), 17-23.

Prendergast, Tess. “Seeking Early Literacy for All: An Investigation of Children’s Librarians and Parents of Young Children with Disabilities’ Experiences at the Public Library.” Library Trends 65, no. 1 (2016): 65-91.

Ripat, J., & Becker, P. (2012) “Playground Usability: What do playground users say?” Occupational Therapy International 19, 44-153.

Spencer-Cavaliere, N., & Watkinson, E.J. (2010). “Inclusion Understood From the Perspectives of Children with Disability.” Adapted  Physical Activity Quarterly 27: 275-293.

Thompson, Rachel H., Nicole M. Cotnoir-Bichelman, Paige M. McKerchar, Trista L. Tate, and Kelly A. Dancho, “Enhancing Early Communication through Infant Sign Training,” L. Hagopian, ed. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis 40 no. 1 (2007):15-23.

Wardle, Francis. 2018. “Identifying Young Children with Disabilities.” Exchange 40:6, 41-44.

Watkins, Ruth V. 1996. “Natural Literacy: Theory and Practice for Preschool Intervention Programs.” Topics in Early Childhood Special Education 16, no.

Weiss, Mary Jane and Sandra Harris. 2001. Reaching Out, Joining In: Teaching Social Skills to Young Children with Autism. Bethesda, MD: Woodbine House.

Online sites

Updating Material to Be Relevant

Brytani, “Storytime for Social Justice: Ethnocentrism,” Storytime Underground, May 15, 2017, http://storytimeunderground.org/2017/05/15/storytime-underground-ethnocentrism/, accessed August 11, 2018; Due to some scientific inaccuracies but also as a response to the “current effort against fat-shaming,” Hap Palmer he changed the word “fat” to “heavy” in his iconic “The Elephant” song. Palmer, H. (2018). “Your wonderful song, The Elephant”. [email to author].

These ideas were taken from a Google document accessed via a link on Brytani’s Storytime Underground post above (https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Umh2DubG-L83wnQqix_JF0FvA2qFdAOeenxIdjAC9fQ/edit/) titled “GuerillaStoryTime Idea—J Meeting 01/01/17,” accessed August 11, 2018.

Genishi, Celia and Dyson, Anne Haas. Children, Language and Literacy: Diverse Learners in Diverse Times. New York: Teachers College Press, 2009.

Loomans, Diana, Julia Loomans, and Karen Kolberg, Positively Mother Goose (Tiburon: HJ Kramer, 2001).

Child Development

Berger, Kathleen Stassen, 2011. The Developing Person through Childhood and Adolescence. New York: Worth Publishers, Ninth Edition.

Berman, Jen. Superbaby: 12 Ways to Give Your Child a Head Start in the First 3 Years. New York: Sterling, 2010.

Brazelton, T. Berry, and Sparrow, Joshua, D. Touchpoints: Birth to Three. Second Edition. Cambridge, MA: Da Capo, 2006.

Eisenberg, A., H. Murkoff, & S. Hathaway. What to Expect:  The Toddler Years. NY: Workman, 2011.

Gandini. Lella and Carolyn Pope Edwards, eds. Bambini: The Italian Approach to Infant/Toddler Care. New York: Teachers College Press, 2001.

Herr, Judy and Terri Swim. Creative Resources for Infants and toddlers. Albany, NY: Delmar, 1999.

Kagan, Jerome. 1984. The Nature of the Child. NY: Basic Books.

McMullen, Mary Benson, et. al. 2009. “Learning to be ‘Me’ While Coming to Understand “We”: Encouraging Prosocial Babies in Group Settings.” Young Children 64(4): 20-28.

Madden, Tobias and Naomi Cytron. 2003. Government’s Role in Early Childhood Development. (September): paper published by the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.

Pappano, Laura. “Kids Haven’t Changed: Kindergarten Has.” Harvard Education Letter September/October 2010

Piaget, J. (1962). The stages of the intellectual development of the child. Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic, 26, 120-128

Piaget, Jean. 1962. Play, Dreams and Imitation in Childhood. New York: W.W. Norton.

Piaget, Jean. 1951. The Child’s Conception of the World. London: Routledge.

Piaget, Jean, Howard E. Gruber & J. Jacques Vonèche. 1995. The Essential Piaget. Northvale, NJ: J. Aronson.

Porter, Phyllis. 2003. “Early Brain Development: What Parents and Caregiver Need To Know.” Educarer. Available: www.educarer.com/brain.htm.

Santrock, John W. 2001. Child Development. Ninth Edition. Boston: McGraw Hill.

Shonkoff, J. P. and D. Phillips (Eds.). 2000. From Neurons to Neighborhoods: The Science of Early Childhood Development. Committee on Integrating the Science of Early Childhood Development. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Virginia’s Early Childhood Development Alignment Project. Milestones of Child Development: A Guide to Young Children’s Learning and Development from Birth to Kindergarten. www.dss.virginia.gov/family/cc/index.html.

Washington, Valora and J.D Andrews, eds. Children of 2010. Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children, 1998.

Zero to Three. “Healthy Minds: Promoting Your Child’s Development from 9 to 12 Months.” http://www.zerotothree.org/child-development/brain-development/9-12months.pdf

The Whole Child

Diamond, Adele. “The Evidence Base for Improving School Outcomes by Addressing the Whole Child and by Addressing Skills and Attitudes, Not Just Content,” Early Education and Development 21, no. 2 (2010): 780–93.

New York Times article about The Fast Track Project. Studies that have been taking place showing that social and emotional skills are most important and can determine what kind of adult a child will grow up to be.
http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/07/24/building-social-skills-to-do-well-in-math/?smid=nytcore-iphone-share&smprod=nytcore-iphone

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: Administration for Children and Families. 2003. Head Start Faces 2000: A Whole-Child Perspective on Program Performance – Fourth Progress Report. Washington: Administration for Children and Families. Available: www.acf.hss.gov/programs/core/ongoing_research/faces/faces00_4thprogress/faces00_title.html.

 

Economic Benefits of Investing in Early Childhood

Bartik, Timothy J. 2014. “From Preschool to Prosperity: The Economic Payoff to Early Childhood Education.”

Bartik, Timothy J., William Gormley, and Shirley Adelstein. 2012. “Earnings benefits of Tulsa’s pre-K program for different income groups.” Economics of Education Review 31, no. 6: 1143-1161.

Becker, Gary S. 1962. “Investment in Human Capital: A Theoretical Analysis.” Journal of Political Economy, 70(5): pp .9-49.

Ben-Porath, Yoram. 1967. “The Production of Human Capital and the Life Cycle of Earnings.” Journal of Political Economy, 75(4): 352-365.

Belfield, Clive and Heather Schwartz. 2007. “The Cost of High-Quality Pre-School Education in New Jersey.” Education Law Center.

Belfield, Clive R., Milagros Nores, Steve Barnett, and Lawrence Schweinhart. 2006. “The High/Scope Perry Preschool Program Cost–Benefit Analysis Using Data from the Age-40 Followup.” Journal of Human Resources 41, no. 1: 162-190..”

Cartmill, Erica A. (2016). “Mind the Gap: Assessing and Addressing the Word Gap in Early Education.” Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3(2), 186-199.

Chetty, R., Friedman, J. N., Hilger, N., Saez, E., Whitmore Schanzenbach, D., & Yagan, D. (2011). How does your kindergarten classroom affect your earnings? Evidence from Project STAR. Quarterly Journal of Economics, 126, 1593–1660. doi:10.1093/qje/qjr041
“Children entering kindergarten with greater reading and mathematics achievement are more likely to attend college and enroll in higher quality institutions. They are also more likely to own homes, have 401(k) savings, be married, and live in higher income neighborhoods as adults.”

Chetty, Raj, John N. Friedman, and Jonah E. Rockoff. The long-term impacts of teachers: Teacher value-added and student outcomes in adulthood. No. w17699. National Bureau of Economic Research, 2011.

Connell, Christian M., and Ronald J. Prinz. “The impact of childcare and parent–child interactions on school readiness and social skills development for low-income African American children.” Journal of School Psychology 40, no. 2 (2002): 177-193.

Duncan, G. J., & Magnuson, K. (2013). Investing in preschool programs. The Journal of Economic Perspectives, 27(2), 109–131.

Hoff, Erika. 2003. “The Specificity of Environmental Influence: socioeconomic Status Affects Early Vocabulary Development Via Maternal Speech.” Child Development 74, no. 5: 1368-1378.

Knudsen, Eric I., James J. Heckman, Judy L. Cameron, and Jack P. Shonkoff. 2006. “Economic, Neurobiological, and Behavior Perspectives on Building America’s Future Workforce.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, 103(27): 10155-10162.

Krashen, Stephen & Fay Shin. 2004. “Summer Reading and the Potential Contribution of the Public Library in Improving Reading for Children of Poverty.” Public Library Quarterly 23: ¾, 2004, 99 – 109

Nespeca, Sue McCleaf. 1995. “Urban Head Start Mothers: Their Personal Reading Habits, Involvement in Sharing Books with Their Children, and Perceptions of Their Public Library.” Journal of Youth Services in Libraries 8: 188-194.

Neuman, Susan B. 1999. “Books Make A Difference: A Study of Access to Literacy.” Reading Research Quarterly 34, No. 3 (July/August/September): 286-311.

Neuman, Susan B., and Kathy Roskos. 1993. “Access to Print for Children of Poverty: Differential Effects of Adult Mediation and Literacy-Enriched Play Settings on Environmental and Functional Print Tasks.” American Educational Research Journal 30, no. 1: 95-122.

Neuman, Susan B., Donna C. Celano, Albert N. Greco, and Pamela Shue. 2003. Access for All: Closing the Book Gap for Children in Early Education. International Reading Association.

Neuman, Susan B. “Children Engaging in Storybook Reading: The Influence of Access to Print Resources, Opportunity, and Parental Interaction,” Early Childhood Research Quarterly 11, no. 3 (1996): 495–513.

Raver, C.C., et al., Predicting individual differences in low-income children’s executive control from early to middle childhood. Developmental Science, 2013. 16(3): p. 394-408.

Rolnick, A., and R. Grunewald. 2003. “Early Childhood Development: Economic Development with a High Public Return.” The Region (December): 6–12.

Sabol, T. J., & Pianta, R. C. (2012). Patterns of school readiness forecast achievement and socioemotional development at the end of elementary school. Child Development, 83, 282–299. doi:10.1111/j.1467-8624.2011.01678.x
<i>“Children with greater academic and behavioral functioning at kindergarten entry often experience better educational and societal opportunities as they age” (Duncan et al., 2007; Sabol & Pianta, 2012).</i>

Shonkoff, Jack P. 2004. Science, Policy, and the Young Developing Child: Closing the Gap Between What We Know and What We Do. Chicago: Ounce of Prevention Fund. Available: http://www.ounceofprevention.org/downloads/publications/shonkoffweb.pdf

Schulman, Karen. 2003. Key Facts: Essential Information About Child Care, Early Education and School-Age Care. Washington, D.C.” Children’s Defense Fund.

Schulman, Karen and Helen Blank. 2004. “Child Care Assistance Policies 2001-2004: Families Struggling to Move Forward, States Going Backward.” National Women’s Law Center. Issue Brief September 2004. Washington, DC: National Women’s Law Center.

Sonnenschein, S., Metzger, S.R., & Thompson, J.A. (2016). Low-income parents’
socialization of their preschoolers’ early reading and math skills. Research in
Human Development, 13, 207-224

Sparks, Phil, and Kathleen Woodward. “Long-Term Study of Adults Who Received High-Quality Childhood Care and Education Shows Economic and Social Gains, Less Crime.” High/Scope Educational Research Foundation. Press Release, (November 18, 2004) Available: www.highscope.org/PressRoom/PressReleases/PerryP-Age40.htm.

Stipek, D. (1992). Characterizing early childhood programs for poor and middle class children. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 7, 1-19

Stipek, D.J. & Ryan, R.H. (1997). Economically disadvantaged preschoolers: Ready to learn but further to go. Developmental Psychology, 33, 711-723

Storch, SA, Whitehurst, GJ. 2001. “The Role of Family and Home in the Literacy Development of Children from Low-Income Backgrounds.” New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development Summer (92): 53-71; discussion 91-8/ State University of New York at Stony Book, USA.

Temple, J.A., and A.J. Reynolds, in E. Zigler, W. Gilliam, and S. Jones (Eds). A vision for universal prekindergarten (2006). New York: Cambridge University Press.

Walker, D., Greenwood, C., Hart, B., & Carta, J. (1994). Prediction of school outcomes based on early language production and socioeconomic factors. Child Development, 65, 606–621.

West, Anne. “Poverty and educational achievement: why do children from low-income families tend to do less well at school?” Benefits 15.3 (2007): 283-297.

Wresch, William. 1996. Disconnected: Haves and Have-nots in the Information Age. New Jersey: Rutgers University Press.

Young, W. T. (1974). Musical development in preschool disadvantaged children. Journal of Research in Music Education 22, 3, 155-169.

The Economics of Early Childhood Investment”, United States White House Report (December 2014, compliments “The High/Scope Perry Preschool Study through Age 40” reading from last time)

Sections to read: Executive Summary (p. 3-4), Introduction (p. 5), Inequalities in Parental Time, Resources and Education (p. 10-14), The Impact Early Childhood Interventions on Children and Parents (p. 17), Why Do Test Score Effects Fade Even Though There Are Long-Term Benefits? (p. 23), The “Active Ingredients” in Successful Early Childhood Programs (p. 25-27), Conclusion (p. 33-34)
https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/docs/early_childhood_report1.pdf

 

Outreach / Public Libraries (inside and out)

Bharat Mehra, Rebecca Davis, (2015) “A strategic diversity manifesto for public libraries in the 21st century”, New Library World, Vol. 116 Issue: 1/2, pp.15-36, https://doi.org/10.1108/NLW-04-2014-0043

Borgman, Christine L. 2001.  From Gutenberg to the Global Information Infrastructure: Access to Information in the Networked World.  (Cambridge: MIT),

Cahill, M. 2004. “Meeting the Early Literacy Needs of Children Through Preschool Outreach Storytime Programs.” Knowledge Quest 33, no. 2: 61-62.

Countryman, Gratia. “The Library as a Social Center,” Public Libraries 7 (December 1991).

Czarnecki, Elaine, Dorothy Stoltz, and Connie Wilson, “Every child was ready to learn! A training package for home childcare providers that produced proven results in early literacy outreach,” Public Libraries 47, no. 3 (May/June 2008): 45-51.

DeSalvo, Nancy. Beginning with Books: Library Programming for Infants, Toddlers, and Preschool Children (Library Professional Publications, 1993).

Diamant-Cohen, Betsy. Mother Goose on the Loose: Here, There, and Everywhere (Chicago: ALA Editions, 2018).

Diamant, Betsy. “The Library as an Institution for Social Change: Social Growth and Development of Children Through Utilization of Library Programs.” Senior Thesis. Brandeis University, 1980, 42.

Ditzion, Sidney H. Arsenals of a Democratic Culture: A Social History of the America Public Library Movement in New England and the Middle States from 1850 to 1600. (American Library Association: Chicago, 1947).

DuMont, Rosemary Ruhig.  Reform and Reaction: The Big City Public library in American Life (Westport, Conn: Greenwood Press, 1977).

Fehrenback, Laurie, David P. Hurford, Carolyn Fehrenbach, and Rebecca Grove Brannock. 1998. “Developing the Emergent Literacy of Preschool Children Through a Library Outreach Program.” Journal of Youth Services in Libraries No. 1: 40-45.

Greene, Ellin. Books, Babies and Libraries:  (ALA Editions, 1991).

Kalisch, Philip Arthur, D. Ed. 1969. The Enoch Pratt Free Library: A Social History. Metuchen: Scarecrow.

Kranich, Nancy. Libraries & Democracy: The Cornerstone of Liberty. Chicago: American Library Association, 2001.

Marino, Jane and Dorothy F. Houlihan’s Mother Goose Time: Library programs for babies and their caregivers (NY: H.W. Wilson, 1992).

McClure Charles R., et al. Planning and Role Setting for Public Libraries (Chicago: American Library Association, 1987.

McQueen Sharon, and Douglas L. Sweizig.  “What Goes Around: Telephone Reference Rotary Wheels.”  Public Libraries 42 (September-October 2003): 309-314.

Molz, Redmond Kathleen, and Phyllis Dain.  1999.  Civic Space/Cyberspace: The American Public Library in the Information Age.  Cambridge: MIT.

Nelson, Josephus and Judith Farley. 1991. Full Circle: Ninety Years of Service in the Main Reading Room.  Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress.

Neuman, Susan and Donna Celano. The Importance of the Library for Vulnerable Young Children. Final report to the William Penn Foundation, Philadelphia, 2002.

Neuman, Susan and Donna Celano. “Save the Libraries!” Educational Leadership 61, no. 6 (2004).

Shuman,  Bruce A. Beyond the Library of the Future: More Alternative Futures for the Public Library. Englewood: Libraries Unlimited, 1997.

Stolz, Dorothy with Gail Griffith, James Kelly, Muffie Smith, & Lynn Wheeler. 2018. Transform and Thrive: Ideas to Invigorate Your Library and Your Community. Chicago: ALA Editions.

Sullivan, Michael. about “The Fragile Future of Public Libraries.” Public Libraries  42(5), 303-308.

Van Slyck, Abigail, A. 1995. Free to All: Carnegie Libraries & American Culture 1890-1920. Chicago: University of Chicago.

Walter, Virginia A. 2001. Children & Libraries: Getting it Right. Chicago: ALA.

Walter, Virginia A. “Public library service to children and teens: A research agenda,” Library Trends 51, no. 4 (2003): 571-89 and Twenty First Century Kids, Twenty First Century Librarians (Chicago: American Library Association, 2009)

Williams, Patrick. The American Public Library and the Problem of Purpose. (New York: Greenwood Press, 1988).

Premature Babies / Early Literacy in the NICU

Abdeyazdan, Z., Shahkolahi, Z., Mehrabi, T., & Hajiheidari, M. (2014). A family support intervention to reduce stress among parents of preterm infants in neonatal intensive care unit. Iranian journal of nursing and midwifery research, 19(4), 349.

Barnell, R. (2012). Neonatal Nightingales: Live Parental and Neonatal Nurse Infant-Directed Singing as a Beneficial Intervention for the Health and Development of Infants in Neonatal Care.

Cassidy, J. W., & Standley, J. M. (1995). The effect of music listening on physiological responses of premature infants in the NICU. Journal of music therapy, 32(4), 208-227.

Cevasco, A. M. (2008). The effects of mothers’ singing on full-term and preterm infants and maternal emotional responses. Journal of music therapy, 45(3), 273-306.

Chorna, O. D., Slaughter, J. C., Wang, L., Stark, A. R., & Maitre, N. L. (2014). A pacifier-activated music player with mother’s voice improves oral feeding in preterm infants. Pediatrics, 133(3), 462.

Diamant-Cohen, B., Sonnenschein, S., Sacks, D., Rosswog, S., & Hussey-Gardner, B. (2018). Mother Goose in the NICU: Support for the Neediest Infants and Their Families. Children and Libraries, 16(1), 3-7.

Durando, E. (2013) Study suggests private NICU rooms may influence preemies’ development. Washington University in St. Louis Newsroom.

Gooding, J., Cooper, L., Blaine, A,, Franck, L., Howse, J., & Berns, S. (2011). Family
support and familycentered care in the neonatal intensive care unit: Origins, advances,
impact. Seminars in Perinatology, 35(1), 2028.

Hess, C. R., Teti, D. M., & Hussey-Gardner, B. (2004). Self-efficacy and parenting of high-risk infants: The moderating role of parent knowledge of infant development. Journal of applied developmental psychology, 25(4), 423-437.

Hussey-Gardner, B. (2008) Understanding My Signals. Vort.

Hussey-Gardner, B., & Famuyide, M. (2009). Developmental interventions in the NICU: what are the developmental benefits?. NeoReviews, 10(3), e113-e120.

Hussey-Gardner, B., Sonnenschein, S., Shanty, L., Dowling, R., Sacks, D., & Diamant-Cohen, B. (2018). Goslings: An Early Language & Literacy Program for Families with Infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Am Acad Pediatrics, 176.

Hussey-Gardner, B., McNinch, A., Anastasi, J., & Miller, M. (2002). Early intervention best practice: Collaboration among an NICU, an early intervention program, and an NICU follow-up program. Neonatal Network, 21(3), 15-22.

Jobe, A. H. (2014). Sensory deprivation in private rooms in the NICU. The Journal of pediatrics, 164(1), 1-3.

Kuhl, P.A. (2010). Brain mechanisms in early language acquisition. Neuron 67(5): 713-727.

Lester, B. M., Hawes, K., Abar, B., Sullivan, M., Miller, R., Bigsby, R., … & Padbury, J. F. (2014). Single-family room care and neurobehavioral and medical outcomes in preterm infants. Pediatrics, 134(4), 754-760.

Levesque, B. M., Tran, A., Levesque, E., et. al. (2018, January.) Implementation of a pilot program of Reach Out and Read in teh neonatal intensive care unit: a quality improvement initiative. Journal of Perinatology 38: 759-766. https://doi.org/10.1038/241372-018-0060-8

Loewy, J. (2015). NICU music therapy: Song of kin as critical lullaby in research and practice. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1337(1), 178-185.

Loewy, J., Stewart, K., Dassler, A., Telsey, A., & Homel, P. (2013). The effects of music
therapy on vital signs, feeding, and sleep in premature infants. Pediatrics, 131(5), 902918.

Neal, D. O., & Lindeke, L. L. (2008). Music as a nursing intervention for preterm infants in the NICU. Neonatal Network-Journal of Neonatal Nursing, 27(5), 319.

Pineda, R. G., Neil, J., Dierker, D., Smyser, C. D., Wallendorf, M., Kidokoro, H., … & Van Essen, D. C. (2014). Alterations in brain structure and neurodevelopmental outcome in preterm infants hospitalized in different neonatal intensive care unit environments. The Journal of pediatrics164(1), 52-60.

Roa, E., & Ettenberger, M. (2018). Music Therapy Self-Care Group for Parents of Preterm Infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A Clinical Pilot Intervention. Medicines, 5(4), 134.

Sonnenschein, S., Dowling, R., & Shanty, L. (2017, January). Evaluation of the Mother
Goose on the Loose Goslings program. Sponsored by PNC Grow Up Great.

Sonnenschein, S., Dowling, R., Shanty, L., & Hussey-Gardner, B. (2018, January).
Evaluation of year 2 of the Mother Goose on the Loose Goslings program.
Sponsored by PNC Grow Up Great.

Standley, J. (2012). Music therapy research in the NICU: An updated meta-analysis. Neonatal Network, 31(5), 311-316.

Standley, J. M. (2014, June). Premature infants: Perspectives on NICU-MT practice. In Voices: A World Forum for Music Therapy 14(2).

Standley, J. M., & Moore, R. S. (1995). Therapeutic effects of music and mother’s voice on premature infants. Pediatric Nursing, 21(6), 509-12.

Ward, K. (2001). Perceived needs of parents of critically ill infants in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Pediatric nursing27(3), 281.

Toxic Stress

Franke HA. Toxic Stress: Effects, Prevention and Treatment. Children (Basel). 2014;1(3):390-402. Published 2014 Nov 3. doi:10.3390/children1030390

 

The State of Education Today

Bassok, D., Latham, S., & Rorem, A. (2016). Is kindergarten the new first grade? How early
elementary school is changing in the age of accountability. AERA Open, 1(4), 1–31. https://doi. org/10.1177/2332858415616358