Research Supporting All Aspects of MGOL

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To support my recent book, Mother Goose on the Loose, Updated (ALA Editions, 2019), I am in the process of compiling a list of all of the research and resources that I have used throughout the years. Together, these have supported the creation and continuing development of Mother Goose on the Loose (MGOL). In my new book, I chose to honor the original research upon which MGOL was built instead of replacing each citation with a newer one. (I did also include some new citations for the newer research mentioned.)

Because of that, on this website I have created an ongoing bibliography, ordered eclectically by topic, of countless resources that have influenced the development of Mother Goose on the Loose. It will be impossible to capture EVERYTHING, but at least this gives a good background.

Early Literacy

Adams MJ. 1990. Beginning to read: Thinking and learning about print. MIT Press.

Armbruster B, Lehr F & Osborn J. 2003. A child becomes a reader: Birth through preschool. National Institute for Literacy.

Bennett-Armistead VS, Duke NK & Moses AM. 2005. Literacy and the youngest learner. Scholastic.

Birckmayer J. The role of public libraries in emergent and family literacy. Zero to Three. December/January 2000-2001: 24- 29.

Blair C & Razza RP. Relating effortful control, executive function, and false belief understanding to emerging math and literacy ability in kindergarten. Child Development. 2007: 78(2): 647-663.

Braunger J & Lewis JP. 1998. Building a knowledge base in reading. 2nd ed. Northwest Regional Laboratory.

Burns MS, Griffin P & Snow CE, eds. 1999. Starting out right: A guide to promoting children’s reading success. National Academy Press.

Celano D & Neuman SB. 2001. The role of public libraries in children’s literacy development: An evaluation report. Pennsylvania Library Association.

Christie JF & Enz B. The effects of literacy play interventions on preschoolers’ play patterns and literacy development. Early Education and Development. 1992: 3(3): 205-220.

Cullinan BE, Greene E & Jaggar AM. Books, babies, and libraries: The librarian’s role in literacy development. Language Arts. 1990: 67(7):750-750.

DeSalvo NN. 1993. Beginning with books. Library Professional Publications.

Diamant-Cohen B & Ghoting SN. 2010. Early literacy kit: A handbook and tip cards. American Library Association.

Dickinson D, Golinkoff RM, Hirsh-Pasek K, Neuman S & Burchinal P. 2009. The language of emergent literacy: A response to the national institute for literacy report on early literacy. National Institute for Early Education Research.

Dickinson DK & Neuman SB. 2006. Handbook of early literacy research: Volume II. Guilford.

Fields MV & Spangler KL. 1995. Let’s begin reading right: Developmentally appropriate beginning literacy (3rd ed.). Prentice Hall.

Irwin JR, Moore DL, Tornatore LA, & Fowler AE. 2012. Expanding on early literacy. Children & Libraries: The Journal of the Association for Library Service to Children. 10(2): 20-28.

Kuhl PK. Brain mechanisms in early language acquisition. Neuron. 2010: 67(5): 713-727.

Landry SH, Swank PR, Smith KE, Assel MA & Gunnewig SB. Enhancing early literacy skills for preschool children: Bringing a professional development model to scale. Journal of Learning Disabilities. 2006: 30(4): 306-324.

Lonigan CJ & Shanahan T. Developing early literacy: Report of the National Early Literacy Panel. Executive summary. A scientific synthesis of early literacy development and implications for intervention. National Institute for Literacy. 2009.

Minkel W. It’s never too early. School Library Journal. July 2002: 48(7): 38-42.

Neuman SB. Lessons from my mother reflections on the national early literacy panel report. Educational Researcher. 2010: 39(4): 301-304.

Parlakian R & Lerner C. Beyond twinkle, twinkle. Young Children. 2010: 14-19.

Pullen PC & Justice LM. Enhancing phonological awareness, print awareness, and oral language skills in preschool children. Intervention in School and Clinic. 2003: 39(2): 87-98.

Roskos KA, Christie JF & Richgels DJ. 2003. The essentials of early literacy instruction. National Association for the Education of Young Children.

Saracho ON. Literacy and language: New developments in research, theory, and practice. Early Child Development and Care. 2017: 187: 3-4, 299-304.

Schickedanz JA. 2008. Increasing the power of instruction: Integration of language, literacy, and math across the preschool day. National Association for the Education of Young Children.

Selmi AM, Gallagher R, & Mora-Flores ER. 2015. Early childhood curriculum for all learners: Integrating play and literacy. SAGE.

Serpell R, Baker L & Sonnenschein S. 2005. Becoming literate in the city: The Baltimore Early Childhood Project. Cambridge.

Sonnenschein S, Baker L, Serpell R, Schmidt D. 2000. Reading is a source of entertainment: The importance of the home perspective for children’s literacy development. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates Publishers.

Stoltz D, Czarnecki EM & Wilson C. 2013. Every child ready for school. American Library Association.

Storch SA & Whitehurst GJ. The role of family and home in the literacy development of children from low‐income backgrounds. New directions for child and adolescent development. 2001: 2001(92): 53-72.

Sulzby E & Teale W. Emergent literacy. Handbook of reading research. 1991: 2: 727-757.

Teale W. 2002. Life and literacy: Birth to five. Reported at the ALSC Leadership Institute in St. Louis, MO.

Weigel DJ,Martin SS & Bennett KK. Contributions of the home literacy environment to preschool-aged children’s emerging literacy and language skills. Early Child Development and Care. 2006:176 (3-4): 357–78.

White D. 1984. Books before five. Heinemann Educational Books.

Winters KL & Griffin SM. Singing is a celebration of language: Using music to enhance young childrens vocabularies. Language and Literacy. 2014: 16(3): 78-91

Vocabulary

Anderson RC & Freebody P. 1981. Vocabulary knowledge. In 1. T. Guthrie (Ed.), Comprehension and teaching: Research reviews. International Reading Association. p. 77-177.

Beck IL, McKeown MG & Kucan L. Taking delight in words: Using oral language to build young children’s vocabularies. American Educator. Spring 2003: 27(1).

Braunger J & Lewis JP. 1998. Building a knowledge base in reading. 2nd ed. Northwest Regional Laboratory.

Cabell SQ, Justice LM, McGinty AS, DeCoster J, Forston LD. Teacher-child conversations in preschool classrooms: Contributions to children’s vocabulary development. Early Childhood Research Quarterly. 2015: 300(Part A): 80-92.

Cartmill EA, Armstrong BF, Gleitman LR, Goldin-Meadow S, Medina TN & Trueswell JC. Quality of early parent input predicts child vocabulary 3 years later. National Academy of Sciences. 2013 : 110(28): 11278-11283.

DeCasper A & Spence M. Prenatal maternal speech influences newborn’s perception of speech sounds. Infant Behavior and Development. 1986: 9: 133–150.

Elley WB. Vocabulary acquisition from listening to stories. Reading Research Quarterly. 1989: 24(2): 174-187.

Farkas G & Beron K. The detailed age trajectory of oral vocabulary knowledge: Differences by class and race. Social Science Research. 2004: 33: 464–97.

Golinkoff RM, Can DD, Soderstrom M & Hirsh-Pasek K. (Baby) talk to me: The social context of infant-directed speech and its effects on early language acquisition. Current Directions in Psychological Science. 2015: 24(5): 339-344.

Hargrave AC & Sénéchal M. A book reading intervention with preschool children who have limited vocabularies: The benefits of regular reading and dialogic reading. Early Childhood Research Quarterly. 2000: 15(1): 75-90.

Hart B & Risley T. 1995. Meaningful differences in the everyday experience of young American children. Paul H Brookes Publishing.

Hirsh-Pasek K, Adamson L, Bakeman R, Golinkoff RM, Pace A, Yust P & Suma K. The contribution of early communication to low-income children’s language success. Psychological Science. 2015: 26: 1071-1083.

Hoff E. Environmental supports for language acquisition. In D. K. Dickinson & S. B. Neuman (Eds.). Handbook of early literacy research. 2006: 2: 163–172.

Kachergis G, Yu C, Shiffrin RM. Actively learning object names across ambiguous situations. Topics in Cognitive Science. 2013: 5(1): 200-213.

Kagan SL, Moore E & Bredekamp S. 1995. Reconsidering children’s early development and learning: Toward shared beliefs and vocabulary. National Education Goals Panel.

Kit C. How does a lexical acquisition begin? A cognitive perspective. Cognitive Science. 2003: 1(1): 1-50.

Luo R, Alper RM, Hirsh-Pasek K, Mogul M, Chen Y, Masek LR, Paterson S, Pace A, Adamson LB, Bakeman R & Golinkoff RM. Community-based, caregiver-implemented early language intervention in high-risk families: Lessons learned. Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action. 2019: 13(3): 283-291.

Marulis LM, Neuman SB. The effects of vocabulary intervention on young children’s word learning: A meta-analysis. Review of educational research. September 2010: 80(3): 300-35.

Miller ZF, Fox JK, Moser JS & Godfroid A. Playing with fire: Effects of negative mood induction and working memory on vocabulary acquisition. Cognition and Emotion. 2018: 32(5): 1105-1113.

Morgan PL, Farkas G, Hillemeier MM, Hammer CS & Maczuga S. 24-month-old children with larger oral vocabularies display greater academic and bahavioral functioning at kindergarten entry. Child Development. 2015: 86(5): 1351-1370.

Suskind D, Suskind B & Lewinter-Suskind L. 2015. Thirty million words: Building a child’s brain. Dutton.

Warwick EB. Vocabulary acquisition from listening to stories. Reading research quarterly. 1989: 174-187.

Wasik BA & Hindman AH. Talk alone won’t close the 30-Million word gap. Phi Delta Kappan. 2015: 96(6): 50–54.

Weisleder A & Fernald A. Talking to children matters: Early language experience strengthens processing and builds vocabulary. Psychological Science. 2013: 24(11): 2143-2152.

Winters KL & Griffin SM. Singing is a celebration of language: Using music to enhance young childrens vocabularies. Language and Literacy. 2014: 16(3): 78-91

Yu C & Ballard DH. A unified model of early word learning: Integrating statistical and social cues. Neurocomputing. 2007: 70: 2149–2165.

Print Awareness, Print Motivation, and Visual Literacy

Adams MJ. 1990. Beginning to read: Thinking and learning about print. MIT Press.

Coles R. Interview. How to look at a mountain. Artforum 1993: 92(3): 92-99.

Diamant-Cohen B & Valakos D. Promoting visual literacy using the Mother Goose on the Loose program. Public Libraries. 2007: 46(2): 47-54.

Edmonds E & Candy L. Creativity, art practice, and knowledge. Communications of the ACM. 2002: 91-95.

Epstein AS. Thinking about art: Encouraging art appreciation in early childhood settings. Young Children. 2001: 56 (3): 38–43.

Frey N & Douglas F. Reading and the brain: What early childhood educators need to know. Early Childhood Education Journal. Aug 2010: 38(2): 103-110.

Harris A. Visual supports for students with autism. New Horizons for Learning. 2012: 10(2).

Hirsh-Pasek K & Golinkoff RM. 2007. Celebrate the scribble: Appreciating children’s art. Crayola Beginnings.

Institute of Museum and Library Services. 2013. Growing Young Minds. Institute of Museum and Library Services.

Jalongo MR. 2004. Young children and picture books, 2nd ed. National Association for the Education of Young Children.

Lambert M. Gutter talk and more: Picturebook paratexts, illustration, and design at storytime. Children and Libraries. 2010: 8(3): 36-46.

Lukehart W. Playgrounds for the mind: Drawn to delight: How picturebooks work (and play) today. Children and Libraries. 2010: 8(3): 32-35.

National Research Council. 2001. Eager to learn: Educating our preschoolers. National Academies Press.

Salmon AK. Tools to enhance young children’s thinking. Young Children. 2010: 65(5): 26-31.

Snow CE, Burns MS & Griffin P, eds. 1998. Preventing reading difficulties in young children. National Research Council. National Academy Press.

Wallace M. 2002. I can make that!: Fantastic crafts for kids. Maple Leaf Press.

Phonological Awareness

Bergen D & Mauer D. 2000. Symbolic play, phonological awareness, and literacy skills at three age levels. Roskos KA & Christie JF. 2000. Play and literacy in early childhood: Research from multiple perspectives. (p. 45–62). Lawrence Erlbaum Associates Publishers.

Bryant PD, MacLean M, Bradley L & Crossland J. Rhyme and alliteration, phoneme detection, and learning to read. Developmental Psychology. 1990: 26(3): 429-438.

Phillips BM, Menchetti JC & Lonigan CJ. Successful phonological awareness instruction with preschool children: Lessons from the classroom. Topics Early Child Spec Educ. 2008: 28(1): 3-17.

Pullen PC & Justice LM. Enhancing phonological awareness, print awareness, and oral language skills in preschool children. Intervention in School and Clinic. 2003: 39(2): 87-98.

Ruan Y, Georgiou GK, Song S, Li Y & Shu H. Does writing system influence the associations between phonological awareness, morphological awareness, and reading? A meta-analysis. Journal of Educational Psychology. 2018: 110(2): 180.

Narrative Skills/ Comprehension

Applebee AN. 1978. The child’s concept of story: Ages two to seventeen. The University of Chicago Press.

Blank M & Frank SM. Story recall in kindergarten children: Effect of method of presentation on psycholinguistic performance. Child Development. 1971: 42: 299-312.

Brown AL. Recognition, reconstruction, and recall of narrative sequences by preoperational children. Child Development.1975: 46(1) :156-166.

Emery DW. Helping readers comprehend stories from the characters’ perspectives. The Reading Teacher. 1996: 49: 534-541.

Fox C. 1993. At the very edge of the forest: The influence of literature on storytelling by children. Cassell.

Gurdon MF. The secret power of the children’s picture book – Even infants get profound cognitive and behavioral benefits from sharing a vivid story. The Wall Street Journal. January 2019: C3.

Paris AH & Paris SG. Assessing narrative comprehension in young children. Reading Research Quarterly. 2003: 38: 36-76.

Pellegrini AD & Galda L. The effects of thematic-fantasy play training on the development of children’s story comprehension. American Educational Research Journal. 1982: 19: 443-452.

Zimmermann S & Hutchins C. 2003. 7 keys to comprehension: How to help your kids read it and get it! Three Rivers Press

Oral Language

DeCasper A, Lecanuet J, Busnel M, Granier-Deferre C & Maugeais R. Fetal reactions to recurrent maternal speech. Infant Behavior and Development. 1994: 17(2): 159-164.

DeCasper A & Spence M. Prenatal maternal speech influences newborn’s perception of speech sounds. Infant Behavior and Development. 1986: 9: 133–150.

Dickinson D, Golinkoff RM & Hirsh-Pasek K. Speaking out for language: Why language is central to reading development. Educational Researcher. 2010: 4: 305-310.

Engel S. Storytelling in the first three years. The Zero to Three Journal. 1997:2: 3-6.

Fox M. 2001. Reading magic: Why reading aloud to our children will change their lives forever. Harcourt.

Gros-Louis J, West MJ & King AP. The influence of interactive context on prelinguistic vocalizations and maternal responses. Language Learning and Development. 2016: 12(3): 280-294.

Gros‐Louis J, West MJ & King AP. Maternal responsiveness and the development of directed vocalizing in social interactions. Infancy. 2014: 19(4): 385-408.

Grugeon E. 2005. Teaching speaking and listening in the primary school. David Fulton.

Hirsh-Pasek K, Adamson L, Bakeman R, Golinkoff RM, Pace A, Yust P & Suma K. The contribution of early communication to low-income children’s language success. Psychological Science. 2015: 26: 1071-1083.

Leitão S. Talk to your baby! Early Intervention. 2007: 9(1): 21.

Ma W, Golinkoff RM, Houston D & Hirsh-Pasek K. Word learning in infant-and adult-directed speech. Language Learning and Development. 2011: 7: 209-225.

Moon C, Cooper R & Fifer W. Two-day-olds prefer their native language. Infant Behavior and Development. 1993: 16: 495–500.

Morrow LM. Retelling Stories: A strategy for improving young children’s comprehension, concept of story structure, and oral language complexity. The Elementary School Journal. 1985: 85(5): 646-661.

Scarborough HS & Dobrich W. On the efficacy of reading to preschoolers. Developmental Review. 1994: 14: 245-302.

Shedd MK & Duke NK. The power of planning: Developing effective read-alouds. Young Children. 2008: 63(6): 22-27.

Snow P & Powell M. Youth (in)justice: Oral language competence in early life and risk for engagement in antisocial behavior in adolescence. Trends & Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice. April 2012: 435.

Talbot M. The talking cure. The New Yorker. Jan 12, 2015.

Every Child Ready to Read

Leitão S. Talk to your baby! Early Intervention. 2007: 9(1): 21.

Neuman SB, Celano D. An evaluation of Every Child Ready to Read: A parent education initiative. 2010.

Neuman SB, Noland N & Celano D. 2017. Bringing literacy home: An evaluation of the Every Child Ready to Read Program. American Library Association.

Literacy in the Home Environment

Bus AG, Belsky J, Van Ijzendoom MH & Crnic K. Attachment and bookreading patterns: A study of mothers, fathers and their toddlers. Early Childhood Research Quarterly. 1997: 12: 81-98.

Cartmill EA, Armstrong BF, Gleitman LR, Goldin-Meadow S, Medina TN & Trueswell JC. Quality of early parent input predicts child vocabulary 3 years later. National Academy of Sciences. 2013 : 110(28): 11278-11283.

Fox M. 2001. Reading magic: Why reading aloud to our children will change their lives forever. Harcourt.

Hirsh-Pasek K & Golinkoff RM. Put your data to use: Entering the real world of children and families. Perspectives on Psychological Science. 2019: 14(1): 37-42.

Maloney EA, Converse BA, Gibbs CR, Levine SC, Beilock SL. Jump-starting early childhood education at home: Early learning, parent motivation, and public policy. Perspectives on Psychological Science. 2015: 10(6): 727-732.

Nespeca SM. Urban head start mothers: Their personal reading habits, involvement in sharing books with their children, and perceptions of their public library. Journal of Youth Services in Libraries. 1995. 8: 188-194.

Niklas F, Wirth A, Guffler S, Drescher N & Ehmig SC. The home literacy environment as a mediator between parental attitudes towards shared reading and children’s linguistic competencies. Frontiers in Psychology. 2020: 11: 1628.

Ramos F & Krashen S. The impact of one trip to the public library: Making books available may be the best incentive for reading. Reading Teacher. 1998: 7: 614-615.

Reed J, Hirsh-Pasek K & Golinkoff RM. Learning on hold: Cell phones sidetrack parent-child interactions. Developmental psychology. 2017: 53(8): 1428.

Register D. Examining the relationship between family reported literacy behaviors, early literacy skill methods, and engagement in early childhood music groups. Perspectives: Journal of the Early Childhood and Movement Association. 2012: 7(3-4): 16-24.

Sonnenschein S & Munsterman K. The influence of home-based reading interactions on 5-year-olds’ reading motivations and early literacy development. Early Childhood Research Quarterly. 2002: 17(3): 318-337.

Storch SA & Whitehurst GJ. The role of family and home in the literacy development of children from low-income backgrounds. New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development Summer. 2001: 92: 53-71.

Motivation to Read

McConnell SR & Rabe HL. Home and community factors that promote early literacy development for preschool-aged children. Just in Time Research: Children, Youth, and Families. 1999: 1: 39-46.

McCord S. 1995. The storybook journey: Pathways to literacy through story and play. Prentice Hall.

The Five Practices

Diamant-Cohen B. Talk, sing, read, write and play together. Parents & Practitioner’s News. August 2016.

School Readiness

Ackerman DJ & Barnett WS. Prepared for kindergarten: What does “readiness” mean? National Institute for Early Education Research. March 2005.

Blair C. School readiness: Integrating cognition and emotion in a neurobiological conceptualization of children’s functioning at school entry. American Psychologist. February 2002: 57(2): 111-127.

Blair C. Self-regulation and school readiness. ERIC Digest. 2003.

Blair C & Diamond A. Biological processes in prevention and intervention: The promotion of self-regulation as a means of preventing school failure. Development and Psychopathology. 2002: 20(3): 899-911.

Blair C & Razza RP. Relating effortful control, executive function, and false belief understanding to emerging math and literacy ability in kindergarten. Child Development. 2007: 78(2): 647-663.

Brown E, Benedett B & Armistead ME. Arts enrichment and school readiness for children at risk. Early Childhood Research Quarterly. 2010: 25(1): 112-124.

Burns MS, Griffin P & Snow CE, eds. 1999. Starting out right: A guide to promoting children’s reading success. National Academy Press.

Chapman JW, Tunmer WE & Prochnow JE. Early reading-related skills and performance, reading self-concept, and the development of academic self-concept: A longitudinal study. Journal of Educational Psychology. 2000: 92(4): 703–708.

Christian K, Morrison FJ & Bryant F. Predicting kindergarten academic skills: Interactions among child care, maternal education, and family literacy environments. Early Childhood Research Quarterly. 1998: 13(3): 501–521.

Daily S, Burkhauser M & Halle T. A review of school readiness practices in the states: Early learning guidelines and assessments. Child Trends Early Childhood Highlights series. 2010: 1(3).

Diamant-Cohen B. First day of class: The public library’s role in school readiness. Children and Libraries. 2007: 5(1): 44-52.

Diamant-Cohen B & Ghoting SN. 2010. Early literacy kit: A handbook and tip cards. American Library Association.

Diamond A. The evidence base for improving school outcomes by addressing the whole child and by addressing skills and attitudes, not just content. Early Education and Development. 2010: 21(2): 780–93.

Duncan GJ, Dowsett CJ, Claessens A, Magnuson K, Huston AC, Klebanov P & Japel C. School readiness and later achievement. Developmental Psychology. 2007: 43: 1428–1446.

Grissmer D, Grimm KJ, Aiyer SM, Murrah WM & Steele JS. Fine motor skills and early comprehension of the world: Two new school readiness indicators. Developmental Psychology. 2010: 46(5): 1008.

Hair E, Halle T, Terry-Humen E, Lavelle B & Calkins J. Children’s school readiness in the ECLS-K: Predictions to academic, health, and social outcomes in first grade. Early Childhood Research Quarterly. 2006: 21(4): 431-454.

Hirsh-Pasek K & Golinkoff RM, Berk LE & Singer DG. 2009. A mandate for playful learning in preschool. Oxford University Press.

Kagan SL, Moore EK & Bredekamp S. Reconsidering children’s early development and learning: Toward common views and vocabulary. National Education Goals Panel. 1995: 95(3).

National Reading Panel (US), National Institute of Child Health, & Human Development (US). 2000. Teaching children to read: An evidence-based assessment of the scientific research literature on reading and its implications for reading instruction: Reports of the subgroups. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

National Research Council. 2001. Eager to learn: Educating our preschoolers. National Academies Press.

Neuman SB & Roskos K. 2007. Nurturing knowledge: Building a foundation for school success by linking early literacy to math, science, art, and social studies. Scholastic.

Passe AS. 2010. Is everybody ready for kindergarten? A tool kit for preparing children and families. Redleaf Press.

Pretti-Frontczak K. Stop trying to make kids “ready” for kindergarten. Young Exceptional Children. March 2014: 17: 51-53.

Ramey CT & Ramey SL. Early learning and school readiness: Can early intervention make a difference? Merrill-Palmer Quarterly. 2004: 50: 471–491.

Rimm-Kaufman SE, Pianta RC & Cox MJ. Teachers’ judgments of problems in the transition to kindergarten. Early Childhood Research Quarterly. 2000: 15: 147–166.

Rouse C, Brooks-Gunn J & McLanahan S. School readiness: Closing racial and ethnic gaps: Introducing the issue. Future of Children. 2005: 15(1).

Stoltz D, Czarnecki EM & Wilson C. 2013. Every child ready for school. American Library Association.

Vandivere S, Pitzer L, Halle T & Hair E. 2004. Indicators of early school success and child well-being. Ready Schools Reference Guide. W. K. Kellogg Foundation.

Verdine B, Golinkoff RM, Hirsh-Pasek K & Newcombe N. Finding the missing piece: Blocks, puzzles, and shapes fuel school readiness. Trends in Neuroscience and Education. 2014: 7-13

Webster-Stratton C & Reid MJ. Strengthening social and emotional competence in young children—The foundation for early school readiness and success: Incredible years classroom social skills and problem-solving curriculum. Infants & Young Children. April 2004: 17(2): 96-113.

Zur SS & Johnson-Green E. Time to transition: The connection between musical free play and school readiness. Childhood Education. 2008: 84(5): 295-300.

Social and Emotional Well-being

Beckoff M. Social play behavior: Cooperation, fairness, trust, and the evolution of morality. Journal of Consciousness Studies. 2001:8(2): 81-90.

Berger A. 2011. Self-Regulation: Brain, cognition, and development. American Psychological Association.

Bigelow AE. Discovering self through others: Infants’ preference for social contingency. Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic. 2001: 65(3): 335-346.

Blair C. Self-regulation and school readiness. ERIC Digest. 2003.

Blair C. School readiness: Integrating cognition and emotion in a neurobiological conceptualization of children’s functioning at school entry. American Psychologist. February 2002: 57(2): 111-127.

Blair C & Diamond A. Biological processes in prevention and intervention: The promotion of self-regulation as a means of preventing school failure. Development and Psychopathology. 2002: 20(3): 899-911.

Blair C & Razza RP. Relating effortful control, executive function, and false belief understanding to emerging math and literacy ability in kindergarten. Child Development. 2007: 78(2): 647-663.

Carlson SM. Social origins of executive function development. New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development. 2009: 123: 87-98.

Duckworth A. 2016. Grit: The power of passion and perseverance. Scribner.

Durlak JA, Weissberg RP, Dymnicki AB, Taylor RD & Schellinger KB. The impact of enhancing students’ social and emotional learning: A meta-analysis of school-based universal interventions. Child Development. 2011: 82(1): 405–432.

Fox L & Lentini RH. “You got it!” Teaching social and emotional skills. Young Children. November 2006: 1-7.

Galinsky E. 2010. Mind in the making: The seven essential life skills every child needs. HarperStudio

Galinsky E & Gardner N. Skill 3: Communicating. Teaching Young Children. 2016: 9(5): 28-30.

Garon N, Bryson SE & Smith IM. Executive function in preschoolers: a review using an integrative framework. Psychological bulletin. 2008: 134(1): 31.

Goleman D. 1995. Emotional intelligence: Why it can matter more than IQ. Bantam.

Goleman D. 2006. Social intelligence: The new science of human relationships. Bantam.

Goleman D. 2009. Ecological intelligence: How knowing the hidden impacts of what we buy can change everything. Broadway Books.

Gross JJ. Emotion regulation: Affective, cognitive, and social consequences. Psychophysiology. 2002: 39: 281-291.

Hirsh-Pasek K, Golinkoff RM & Singer DG. 2006. Play= learning: How play motivates and enhances children’s cognitive and social-emotional growth. Oxford University Press.

Hutton JS, Phelan K, Horowitz-Kraus T, Dudley J, Altaye M, DeWitt T, Holland SK. Story time turbocharger? Child engagement during shared reading and cerebellar activation and connectivity in preschool-age children listening to stories. Plos one. 2017 May 31: 12(5): e0177398.

Jalongo MR. 2008. Learning to listen, listening to learn. National Association for the Education of Young Children.

Jones DE, Greenberg M & Crowley M. Early social-emotional functioning and public health: The relationship between kindergarten social competence and future wellness. American Journal of Public Health. 2015: 105(11): 2283-2290.

Joseph GE & Strain PS. 2003. Enhancing emotional vocabulary in young children. The Center on Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Landy S. 2002. Pathways to competence: Encouraging healthy social and emotional development in young children. Brookes.

Lynch TR, Hempel RJ & Dunkley C. Radically open – dialectical behavior therapy for disorders of over-control: Signaling matters. American Journal of Psychotherapy. 2015: 69(2): 141-162.

Matthews G, Zeidner M & Roberts RD. 2005. Emotional intelligence: An elusive ability. Sage.

Meltzer L. 2010. Promoting executive function in the classroom. Guilford Press.

Mendelsohn AL, Cates CB, Weisleder A, Johnson SB, Seery AM, Canfield CF, Huberman HS & Dreyer BP. Reading aloud, play, and social-emotional development. Pediatrics. 2018: 141(5).

Mischel W, Ayduk O, Berman MG, Casey BJ, Gotlib IH, Jonides J, Kross E, Teslovich T, Wilson NL, Zayas V & Shoda Y. ‘Willpower’over the life span: decomposing self-regulation. Social cognitive and affective neuroscience. 2011: 6(2): 252-6.

Miyake A, Friedman NP, Emerson MJ, Witzki AH, Howerter A & Wager TD. The unity and diversity of executive functions and their contributions to complex “frontal lobe” tasks: A latent variable analysis. Cognitive psychology. 2000: 41(1): 49-100.

Morgan PL, Farkas G, Wang Y, Hillemeier MM, Oh Y & Maczuga S. Executive function deficits in kindergarten predict repeated academic difficulties across elementary school. Early Childhood Research Quarterly. 2019: 46: 20-32.

National Scientific Council of the Developing Child. 2004. Children’s emotional development is built into the architecture of their brains. Working Paper #2. Harvard University, Center on the Developing Child.

O’Conner R, De Feyter J, Carr A, Luo JL & Romm H. A review of the literature on social and emotional learning for students ages 3-8: Outcomes for different student populations and settings (Part 4 of 4). REL 2017-248. Regional Educational Laboratory Mid-Atlantic. February 2017.

Pace A, Alper R, Burchinal MR, Golinkoff RM & Hirsh-Pasek K. Measuring success: Within and cross-domain predictors of academic and social trajectories in elementary school. Early Childhood Research Quarterly. 2019: 46: 112-25.

Posner MI & Rothbart MK. Research on attention networks as a model for the integration of psychological science. Annual Review of Psychology. January 2007: 58: 1-23.

Prairie AP. Supporting sociodramatic play in ways that enhance academic learning. Young Children. May 2013L 68(2): 62-68.

Raver CC & Knitzer J. 2002. Ready to enter: What research tells policymakers about strategies to promote social and emotional school readiness among three- and four-year-old children. Columbia University Academic Commons.

Raver CC & Zigler EF. Social competence: An untapped dimension in evaluating head start’s success. Early Childhood Research Quarterly. 1997: 12: 363-385.

Rohlf HL, Holl AK, Kirsch F, Krahé B & Elsner B. Longitudinal links between executive function, anger, and aggression in middle childhood. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience. (2018): 12(27): 12.

Salovey P & Mayer JD. Emotional intelligence. Immagination, cognition and personality. 1990: 9: 185-211.

Strain PS & Wiegerink R. The effects of sociodramatic activities on social interaction among behaviorally disordered preschool children. Journal of Special Education. 1976: 10(1): 71-5.

Uribarri A. 2013. The missing piece: A national teacher survey on how social and emotional learning can empower children and transform schools. CASEL Guide Online.

Webster-Stratton C & Reid MJ. Strengthening social and emotional competence in young children—The foundation for early school readiness and success: Incredible years classroom social skills and problem-solving curriculum. Infants & Young Children. April 2004: 17(2): 96-113.

Weiss MJ & Harris S. 2001. Reaching out, joining in: Teaching social skills to young children with autism. Woodbine House.

Self-Regulation / Executive Function

Aamodt S & Wang S. 2009. Welcome to your brain: Why you lose your car keys but never forget how to drive and other puzzles of everyday behavior. Bloomsbury Publishing.

Ang SY, Lee K, Cheam F, Poon K & Koh J. Updating and working memory training: Immediate improvement, long-term maintenance, and generalizability to non-trained tasks. Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition. 2015: 4: 121–128.

Badegruber B. 2005. 101 life skills games for children: Learning, growing, getting along (ages 6-12). Hunter House.

Barker LA & Morton N. Executive function (s): Conductor, orchestra or symphony? Towards a trans-disciplinary unification of theory and practice across development, in normal and atypical groups. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience. May 2018: 12: 85.

Beckoff M. Social play behavior: Cooperation, fairness, trust, and the evolution of morality. Journal of Consciousness Studies. 2001:8(2): 81-90.

Berger A. 2011. Self-Regulation: Brain, cognition, and development. American Psychological Association.

Bernier A, Carlson SM & Whipple N. From external regulation to self-regulation: Early parenting precursors of young children’s executive functioning. Child Development. 2010: 81: 326–339.

Best JR, Miller PH & Naglieri JA. Relations between executive function and academic achievement from ages 5 to 17 in a large, representative national sample. Learning and Individual Differences. 2011: 21(4): 327–336.

Bierman KL, Nix RL, Greenberg MT, Blair CB & Domitrovich CE. Executive functions and school readiness intervention: Impact, moderation, and mediation in the Head Start REDI program. Development and Psychopathology. 2008: 20(03): 821–843.

Blair C & Diamond A. Biological processes in prevention and intervention: The promotion of self-regulation as a means of preventing school failure. Development and Psychopathology. 2002: 20(3): 899-911.

Blair C, Ursache A, Greenberg M & Vernon-Feagans L. Multiple aspects of self-regulation uniquely predict mathematics but not letter–word knowledge in the early elementary grades. Developmental psychology. April 2015: 51(4): 459.

Blair C & Razza RP. Relating effortful control, executive function, and false belief understanding to emerging math and literacy ability in kindergarten. Child Development. 2007: 78(2): 647-663.

Blair C. Self-regulation and school readiness. ERIC Digest. 2003.

Bodrova E & Leong DJ. 1996. Tools of the mind: The Vygotskian approach to early childhood education. Pearson.

Campos JJ & Stenberg CR. 1981. Perception, appraisal and emotion: The onset of social referencing, in Infant social cognition, M.E. Lamb and L.R. Sherrod, Editors. Erlbaum. p. 273-310.

Chang YK, Tsai YJ, Chen TT & Hung TM. The impacts of coordinative exercise on executive function in kindergarten children: an ERP study. Experimental Brain Research. March 2013: 225(2): 187-96.

Carlson SM. Social origins of executive function development. New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development. 2009: 123: 87-98.

Clements DH & Sarama J. 2019. Executive Function and Early Mathematical Learning Difficulties. International handbook of mathematical learning difficulties. Springer, Cham. p. 755-771.

Dawson P & Guare R. 2009. Smart but scattered: The revolutionary “executive skills” approach to helping kids reach their potential. Guilford Press.

Dawson P & Guare R. Executive skills: The hidden curriculum. Principal Leadership. March 2009: 9(7): 10-4.

Diamant-Cohen B & Hetrick MA. Transforming Preschool Storytime: A modern vision and a year of programs. ALA Neal Schuman.

Fisher AV, Godwin KE & Seltman H. Visual environment, attention allocation, and learning in young children: When too much of a good thing may be bad. Psychological science. July 2014: 25(7): 1362-70.

Galinsky E. 2010. Mind in the making: The seven essential life skills every child needs. HarperStudio

Gross JJ. Emotion regulation: Affective, cognitive, and social consequences. Psychophysiology. 2002: 39: 281-291.

Harvey HA & Miller GE. Executive function skills, early mathematics, and vocabulary in head start preschool children. Early Education and Development. April 2017: 28(3): 290-307.

Hazy TE, Frank MJ & O’Reilly RC. Towards an executive without a homunculus: computational models of the prefrontal cortex/basal ganglia system. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. September 2007: 362(1485): 1601-13.

Kochanska G, Coy KC & Murray KT. The development of self‐regulation in the first four years of life. Child development. August 2001: 72(4): 1091-111.

Koo M & Fishbach A. Dynamics of self-regulation: How (un)accomplished goal actions affect motivation. Motivation Science. 2014: 1(S): 73–90.

LeFevre JA, Berrigan L, Vendetti C, Kamawar D, Bisanz J, Skwarchuk SL & Smith-Chant BL. The role of executive attention in the acquisition of mathematical skills for children in Grades 2 through 4. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. February 2013: 114(2): 243-61.

Lehrer J. “Don’t!.” The secret of self-control. The New Yorker. 2009: 18.

Linder TW. 1999. Read, play, and learn! Storybook activities for young children: Teacher’s guide. Paul H. Brookes.

Miller MR, Rittle-Johnson B, Loehr AM & Fyfe ER. The influence of relational knowledge and executive function on preschoolers’ repeating pattern knowledge. Journal of Cognition and Development. January 2016: 17(1): 85-104.

Mischel W, Ayduk O, Berman MG, Casey BJ, Gotlib IH, Jonides J, Kross E, Teslovich T, Wilson NL, Zayas V & Shoda Y. ‘Willpower’over the life span: decomposing self-regulation. Social cognitive and affective neuroscience. April 2011: 6(2): 252-6.

Mischel W, Ebbesen EB & Raskoff Zeiss A. Cognitive and attentional mechanisms in delay of gratification. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 1972: 21(2): 204–218.

Mischel W. 2014. The marshmallow test: Understanding self-control and how to master it. Random House.

Morgan PL, Farkas G, Wang Y, Hillemeier MM, Oh Y & Maczuga S. Executive function deficits in kindergarten predict repeated academic difficulties across elementary school. Early Childhood Research Quarterly. 2019: 46: 20-32.

Nesbitt KT, Farran DC & Fuhs MW. Executive function skills and academic achievement gains in prekindergarten: Contributions of learning-related behaviors. Developmental psychology. July 2015: 51(7): 865.

Neuenschwander R, Röthlisberger M, Cimeli P & Roebers CM. How do different aspects of self-regulation predict successful adaptation to school? Journal of experimental child psychology. November 2012: 113(3): 353-71.

Otero TM, Barker LA & Naglieri JA. Executive function treatment and intervention in schools. Applied Neuropsychology: Child. July 2014: 3(3): 205-14.

Posner MI & Rothbart MK. Research on attention networks as a model for the integration of psychological science. Annual Review of Psychology. January 2007: 58: 1-23.

Raver CC, Jones SM, Li‐Grining C, Zhai F, Bub K & Pressler E. CSRP’s impact on low‐income preschoolers’ preacademic skills: self‐regulation as a mediating mechanism. Child development. January 2011: 82(1): 362-78.

Raver CC, McCoy DC, Lowenstein AE & Pess R. Predicting individual differences in low‐income children’s executive control from early to middle childhood. Developmental Science. May 2013: 16(3): 394-408.

Raver CC & Zigler EF. Social competence: An untapped dimension in evaluating head start’s success. Early Childhood Research Quarterly. 1997: 12: 363-385.

Razza RP & Raymond K. 2015. Executive functions and school readiness. In S. Robson & S. F. Quinn (Eds.), The

Routledge international handbook of young children’s thinking and understanding. Routledge. p 133-149.

Ruff H & Rothbart M. 1996. Attention in early development: Themes and variations. Oxford University Press.

Seigel D. 1999. The developing mind: Toward a neurobiology of interpersonal experience. Guilford Press.

Shoda Y, Mischel W & Peake PK. Predicting adolescent cognitive and self-regulatory competencies from preschool delay of gratification: Identifying diagnostic conditions. Developmental psychology. November 1990: 26(6): 978.

Swami S. Executive functions and decision making: A managerial review. IIMB Management Review. December 2013: 25(4): 203-12.

Tominey SL & McClelland MM. Red light, purple light: Findings from a randomized trial using circle time games to improve behavioral self-regulation in preschool. Early Education & Development. May 2011: 22(3): 489-519.

Weiland C, Barata MC & Yoshikawa H. The co‐occurring development of executive function skills and receptive vocabulary in preschool‐aged children: A look at the direction of the developmental pathways. Infant and Child Development. January 2014: 23(1): 4-21.

Zelazo PD, Müller U, Frye D, Marcovitch S, Argitis G, Boseovski J, Chiang JK, Hongwanishkul D, Schuster BV, Sutherland A & Carlson SM. The development of executive function in early childhood. Monographs of the society for research in child development. 2003: 68(3): i-151.

Zeytinoglu S, Calkins SD & Leerkes EM. Maternal emotional support but not cognitive support during problem-solving predicts increases in cognitive flexibility in early childhood. International journal of behavioral development. 2019: 43(1): 12-23.

Health and Physical Well-being

Clift S, Hancox G, Staricoff R & Whitmore C. 2008. Singing and health: a systematic mapping and review of non-clinical research. Canterbury Canterbury Christ Church University.

Forencich F. 2006. Exuberant animal: The power of health, play, and joyful movement. AuthorHouse.

Frederickson B. The role of positive emotions in positive psychology: The broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions. American Psychologist. 2001: 56: 218-226.

Fredrickson B. What good are positive emotions? Review of general psychology. 1998: 2: 300–319.

Fredrickson BL. Cultivating positive emotions to optimize health and well-being. Prevention & treatment. 2000: 3(1): 1a.

Ginsburg KR. The importance of play in promoting healthy child development and maintaining strong parent-child bonds. Pediatrics. 2007: 119(1): 182-91.

Greenspan S. 1999. Building healthy minds: The six experiences that create intelligence and emotional growth in babies and young children. Perseus Books.

Jones DE, Greenberg M & Crowley M. Early social-emotional functioning and public health: The relationship between kindergarten social competence and future wellness. American Journal of Public Health. 2015: 105(11): 2283-2290.

Kirk SM, Fuchs W & Kirk EP. Improving preschool literacy skills using physical activity. Research to practice summary. Dialog. 2013: 16(3): 155-59.

Kirk SM, Vizcarra CR, Looney EC & Kirk EP. Using physical activity to teach academic content: a study of the effects on literacy in head start preschoolers. Early Childhood Education Journal. 2014: 42(3): 181-9.

Nelson DW. 2004. KIDS COUNT data book: Moving youth from risk to opportunity. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation.

Stacy R, Brittain K & Kerr S. Singing for health: An exploration of the issues. Health education. 2002.

Approaches to Learning

Bus AG, Belsky J, van Ijzendoom MH & Crnic K. Attachment and bookreading patterns: A study of mothers, fathers, and their toddlers. Early childhood research quarterly. 1997: 12(1): 81-98.

Codell ER. 2003. How to get your child to love reading. Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill.

Dancy RB. 2000. You are your child’s first teacher. CelestialArts.

Helm JH, Berg SM & Scranton P. 2004. Teaching your child to love learning: A guide to doing projects at home. Teachers College Press.

Hirsch ED & Bevilacqua L. 2008. What your preschooler needs to know: Read-alouds to get ready for kindergarten. Bantam Dell.

Hyson M. 2008. Enthusiastic and engaged learners: Approaches to learning in the early childhood classroom. Teachers College Press.

Institute of Museum and Library Services. 2013. Growing Young Minds. Institute of Museum and Library Services.

National Research Council. 2001. Eager to learn: Educating our preschoolers. National Academies Press.

Vitiello VE, Greenfield DB, Munis P & George JL. Cognitive flexibility, approaches to learning, and academic school readiness in Head Start preschool children. Early Education & Development. 2011: 22(3): 388-410.

Language Development

Braunger J & Lewis JP. 1998. Building a knowledge base in reading. 2nd ed. Northwest Regional Laboratory.

Cass-Beggs B. 1986. Your child needs music. Frederick Harris Music co.

Crain-Thoreson C & Dale PS. Do early talkers become early readers? Linguistic precocity, preschool language, and emergent literacy. Developmental psychology. 1992: 28(3): 421-429.

Gilkerson J, Richards JA, Warren SF, Oller DK, Russo R & Vohr B. Language experience in the second year of life and language outcomes in late childhood. Pediatrics. 2018: 142(4).

Golinkoff RM, Can DD, Soderstrom M & Hirsh-Pasek K. (Baby) talk to me: the social context of infant-directed speech and its effects on early language acquisition. Current Directions in Psychological Science. 2015: 24(5): 339-344.

Hirsh-Pasek K, Adamson L, Bakeman R, Golinkoff RM, Pace A, Yust P & Suma K. The contribution of early communication to low-income children’s language success. Psychological Science. 2015: 26: 1071-1083.

Hoff E, Core C, Place S, Rumiche R, Señor M & Parra M. Dual language exposure and early bilingual development. Journal of Child Language: 2012: 39(1): 1–27.

Konishi H, Kanero J, Freeman MR, Golinkoff RM & Hirsh-Pasek K. Six principles of language development: Implications for second language learners. Developmental Neuropsychology. 2014: 39(5): 404-420.

Kuhl PK. Learning and representation in speech and language. Current opinion in neurobiology. 1994: 4(6): 812-822.

Kuhl PK, Tsao FM & Liu HM. Foreign-language experience in infancy: Effects of short-term exposure and social interaction on phonetic learning. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 2003: 100(15): 9096–9101.

McCathren RB & Allor JH. Using storybooks with preschool children: Enhancing language and emergent literacy. Young Exceptional Children. 2002: 5(4): 3-10.

Mendelsohn AL, Cates CB, Weisleder A, Johnson SB, Seery AM, Canfield CF, Huberman HS & Dreyer BP. Reading aloud, play, and social-emotional development. Pediatrics. 2018: 141(5).

Ninio A & Bruner J. The achievement and antecedents of labelling. Journal of Child Language. 1978: 5: 1–15.

Parish-Morris J, Golinkoff RM & Hirsh-Pasek K. From coo to code: Language acquisition in early childhood. In P. Zelazo (Ed.). The Oxford handbook of developmental psychology. 2013: 867–908.

Ribot KM, Hoff E & Burridge A. Language use contributes to expressive language growth: Evidence from bilingual children. Child Development. 2018: 89(3): 929-40.

Roseberry S, Hirsh‐Pasek K & Golinkoff RM. Skype me! Socially contingent interactions help toddlers learn language. Child development. 2014: 85(3): 956-970.

Saracho ON. Literacy and language: New developments in research, theory, and practice. Early Child Development and Care. 2017: 187: 3-4, 299-304.

Thompson RH, Cotnoir‐Bichelman NM, McKerchar PM, Tate TL & Dancho KA. Enhancing early communication through infant sign training. Journal of applied behavior analysis. 2007: 40(1): 15-23.

Vivas E. Effects of story reading on language. Language learning. 1996: 46(2): 189-216.

Wasik BA & Bond MA. Beyond the pages of a book: Interactive book reading and language development in preschool classrooms. Journal of Educational Psychology. 2001: 93: 243-250.

Weisberg D, Zosh J, Hirsh-Pasek K, Golinkoff RM. “Talking it up:” Play, language development and the role of adult support. American Journal of Play. 2013: 6: 39-54.

Weisleder A & Fernald A. Talking to children matters: Early language experience strengthens processing and builds vocabulary. Psychological Science. 2013: 24(11): 2143-2152.

Winters KL & Griffin SM. Singing is a celebration of language: Using music to enhance young childrens vocabularies. Language and Literacy. 2014: 16(3): 78-91

Zimmermann S & Hutchins C. 2003. 7 keys to comprehension: How to help your kids read it and get it! Three Rivers Press.

Reading & Writing / Letter Knowledge

Burns MS, Griffin P & Snow CE. 1999. Starting out right: A guide to promoting children’s reading success. Specific recommendations from America’s leading researchers on how to help children become successful readers. National Academy Press.

Herman PA. The effect of repeated readings on reading rate, speech pauses, and word recognition accuracy. Reading Research Quarterly. 1985: 20(5): 553-65.

Hirsch ED & Bevilacqua L. 2008. What your preschooler needs to know: Read-alouds to get ready for kindergarten. Bantam Dell.

Hirsh-Pasek K & Golinkoff RM. 2007. Celebrate the scribble: Appreciating children’s art. Crayola Beginnings.

Juel C, Biancarosa G, Coker D & Deffes R. Walking with rosie: A cautionary tale of early reading instruction. Educational Leadership. April 2003: 60(7): 12-18.

Juel C. Learning to read and write: A longitudinal study of 54 children from first through fourth grades. Journal of Educational Psychology. 1988: 80(4): 437–447.

Justice L & Pences KL. 2005. Scaffolding with storybooks: A guide for enhancing young children’s language and literacy achievement. International Reading Association.

Kamhi A & Laing S. The path to reading success or reading failure: A choice for the new millennium. In J. Harris, A.

Kamhi, & K. Pollock (Eds.), Literacy in African-American Communities. 2001: 127-146.

Linder TW. 1999. Read, Play, and Learn! Storybook Activities for Young Children: Teacher’s Guide. Paul H. Brookes.

Mol SE, Bus AG & De Jong MT. Interactive book reading in early education: A tool to stimulate print knowledge as well as oral language. Review of Educational Research. 2009: 79(2): 979-1007.

National Reading Panel (US), National Institute of Child Health, & Human Development (US). 2000. Teaching children to read: An evidence-based assessment of the scientific research literature on reading and its implications for reading instruction: Reports of the subgroups. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

National Research Council. 1998. Preventing reading difficulties in young children. National Academies Press.

Schickendanz JA. Much more than ABCs: The early stages of reading. Child Development. 1999.

Schickendanz JA. 1999. Much More Than ABCs: The Early Stages of Reading and Writing. National Association for the Education of Young Children.

Schickedanz JA. 2008. Increasing the power of instruction: Integration of language, literacy, and math across the preschool day. National Association for the Education of Young Children.

Snow CE, Burns MS & Griffin P, eds. 1998. Preventing reading difficulties in young children. National Research Council. National Academy Press.

General Knowledge & STEM

Falk JH, Pruitt II RL, Rosenberg KS & Katz TA. 1996. Bubble monster and other science fun. Chicago Review Press.

Fisher K, Hirsh-Pasek K, Newcombe N & Golinkoff RM. Taking shape: Supporting preschoolers’ acquisition of geometric knowledge. Child Development. November/December 2013: 84(6): 1872-1878.

Jordan NC, Kaplan D, Ramineni C & Locuniak MN. Early math matters: kindergarten number competence and later mathematics outcomes. Developmental psychology. 2009: 45(3): 850.

LeFevre JA, Fast L, Skwarchuk SL, Smith‐Chant BL, Bisanz J, Kamawar D & Penner‐Wilger M. Pathways to mathematics: Longitudinal predictors of performance. Child development. 2010: 81(6): 1753-67.

Needham A, Dueker G & Lockhead G. Infants’ formation and use of categories to segregate objects. Cognition. 2005: 94(3): 215-240.

Phillips BM & Morse EE. Family child care learning environments: Caregiver knowledge and practices related to early literacy and mathematics. Early Childhood Education Journal. 2011: 39(3): 213-22.

Priebe SJ, Keenan JM & Miller AC. How prior knowledge affects word identification and comprehension. Reading and writing. 2012: 25(1): 131-49.

Sarama J & Clements DH. Building blocks and cognitive building blocks: Playing to know the world mathematically. American Journal of Play. 2009: 1(3): 313-337.

Sharapan H. From STEM to STEAM: How early childhood educators can apply Fred Rogers’ approach. Young Children. 2012: 67(1): 36-40.

Suskind D, Suskind B & Lewinter-Suskind L. 2015. Thirty million words: Building a child’s brain. Dutton.

Math

Amalric M & Dehaene S. Cortical circuits for mathematical knowledge: evidence for a major subdivision within the brain’s semantic networks. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 2018: 373(1740): 20160515.

Berkowitz T, Schaeffer MW, Maloney EA, Peterson L, Gregor C, Levine SC & Beilock SL. Math at home adds up to achievement in school. Science. 2015: 350(6257): 196-8.

Blair C, McKinnon RD & Family Life Project Investigators. Moderating effects of executive functions and the teacher–child relationship on the development of mathematics ability in kindergarten. Learning and instruction. 2016: 41: 85-93.

Blair C & Razza RP. Relating effortful control, executive function, and false belief understanding to emerging math and literacy ability in kindergarten. Child Development. 2007: 78(2): 647-663.

Bull R & Scerif G. Executive functioning as a predictor of children’s mathematics ability: Inhibition, switching, and working memory. Developmental neuropsychology. 2001: 19(3): 273-93.

Bull R, Espy KA & Wiebe SA. Short-term memory, working memory, and executive functioning in preschoolers: Longitudinal predictors of mathematical achievement at age 7 years. Developmental neuropsychology. 2008: 33(3): 205-28.

Cannon J & Ginsburg HP. “Doing the math”: Maternal beliefs about early mathematics versus language learning. Early Education and Development. 2008: 19(2): 238-60.

Castellar EN, All A, De Marez L & Van Looy J. Cognitive abilities, digital games and arithmetic performance enhancement: A study comparing the effects of a math game and paper exercises. Computers & Education. 2015: 85: 123-133.

Duncan GJ, Dowsett CJ, Claessens A, Magnuson K, Huston AC, Klebanov P & Japel C. School readiness and later achievement. Developmental Psychology. 2007: 43: 1428–1446.

Geist K, Geist EA & Kuznik K. The patterns of music: Young children learning mathematics through beat, rhythm, and melody. Young Children. 2012: 67(1): 74-79.

Geist E. (2021, January 6). Support math readiness through music. National association for the education of young children. https://www.naeyc.org/our-work/families/support-math-readiness-through-music

Gunderson E A & Levine S C. Some types of parent number talk count more than others: relations between parents’ input and children’s cardinal‐number knowledge. Developmental science. 2011: 14(5): 1021-1032.

Habegger L. Number concept and rhythmic response in early childhood. Music Education Research. 2010: 12 (3): 269-280.

Hanner E, Braham EJ, Elliott L & Libertus ME. Promoting math talk in adult–child interactions through grocery store signs. Mind, Brain and Education. 2019: 13(2): 110-118.

Jordan NC, Kaplan D, Ramineni C & Locuniak MN. Early math matters: kindergarten number competence and later mathematics outcomes. Developmental psychology. 2009: 45(3): 850.

Klein A, Starkey P, Deflorio L & Brown ET. Scaling up an effective pre-k mathematics intervention: mediators and child outcomes. Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness. 2011.

LeFevre JA, Berrigan L, Vendetti C, Kamawar D, Bisanz J, Skwarchuk SL & Smith-Chant BL. The role of executive attention in the acquisition of mathematical skills for children in Grades 2 through 4. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. February 2013: 114(2): 243-61.

Levine SC, Suriyakham LW, Rowe ML, Huttenlocher J & Gunderson EA. What counts in the development of young children’s number knowledge?. Developmental psychology. 2010: 46(5): 1309.

Miller MR, Rittle-Johnson B, Loehr AM & Fyfe ER. The influence of relational knowledge and executive function on preschoolers’ repeating pattern knowledge. Journal of Cognition and Development. January 2016: 17(1): 85-104.

Mix KS, Sandhofer CM, Moore JA & Russell C. Acquisition of the cardinal word principle: The role of input. Early Childhood Research Quarterly. 2012: 27(2): 274-283.

Nguyen T, Watts TW, Duncan GJ, Clements DH, Sarama JS, Wolfe C & Spitler ME. Which preschool mathematics competencies are most predictive of fifth grade achievement?. Early childhood research quarterly. 2016: 36(3): 550-560.

NAEYC & NCTM National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. 2004. Early childhood mathematics: Promoting good beginnings. Joint position statement. NAEYC.

Ramani GB, Rowe ML, Eason SH & Leech KA. Math talk during informal learning activities in Head Start families. Cognitive Development. 2015: 35: 15–33.

Rothman RL, Montori VM, Cherrington A & Pignone MP. Perspective: The Role of Numeracy in Health Care. Journal of Health Communication. 2008: 13(6): 583–595.

Skwarchuk SL, Sowinski C & LeFevre JA. Formal and informal home learning activities in relation to children’s early numeracy and literacy skills: The development of a home numeracy model. Journal of experimental child psychology. 2014: 121: 63-84.

Sonnenschein S, Metzger SR & Thompson JA. Low-income parents’ socialization of their preschoolers’ early reading and math skills. Research in Human Development. 2016: 13: 207-224.

Vandermaas-Peeler M, Boomgarden E, Finn L & Pittard C. Parental support of numeracy during a cooking activity with four-year-olds. International Journal of Early Years Education. 2012: 20: 78–93.

Vandermaas‐Peeler M, Nelson J, Bumpass C & Sassine B. Numeracy‐related exchanges in joint storybook reading and play. International Journal of Early Years Education. 2009: 17(1): 67-84.

Verdine B, Golinkoff R, Hirsh-Pasek K, Newcombe N, Filipowicz A & Chang A. Deconstructing building blocks: Preschoolers’ spatial assembly performance relates to early mathematical skills. Child Development. 2014: 1062-1076.

Zippert EL & Ramani GB. Parents’ estimations of preschoolers’ number skills relate to at‐home number‐related activity engagement. Infant and Child Development. 2016: 26(2).

Essential Components for an Early Literacy Program

Bowman D. (2011, Dec 2). Read It Again, Sam. New York Times. https://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/04/books/review/read-it-again-sam.html?pagewanted=all

Cook G. Repetition and learning by heart: An aspect of intimate discourse, and its implications. ELT journal. 1994: 48(2): 133-141.

Demir ÖE, Rowe ML, Heller G, Goldin-Meadow S & Levine SC. Vocabulary, syntax, and narrative development in typically developing children and children with early unilateral brain injury: Early parental talk about the “there-and-then” matters. Developmental Psychology. 2015: 51(2): 161.

Diamant-Cohen B. First day of class: The public library’s role in school readiness. Children and Libraries. 2007: 5(1): 44-52.

Diamant-Cohen B. Mother Goose on the Loose: Applying brain research to early childhood programs in the public library. Public Libraries. January/February 2004: 41- 45.

Harris TT & Fuqua JD. What Goes Around Comes Around: Building a Community of Learners through Circle Times. Young Children. 2000: 55(1): 44-47.

Krueger C, Holditch-Davis D, Quint S & DeCasper A. Recurring auditory experience in the 28-to 34-week-old fetus. Infant Behavior and Development. 2004: 27(4): 537-543.

Linder TW. Read, Play, and Learn! Storybook Activities for Young Children. 1999. The Transdisciplinary Play-Based Curriculum. Brookes Publishing. Collection 2: Modules 9-16.

Martinez M & Roser N. Read it again: The value of repeated readings during storytime. The Reading Teacher. 1985: 38(8): 782-786.

Morrow LM. Retelling stories: A strategy for improving young children’s comprehension, concept of story structure, and oral language complexity. The Elementary School Journal. 1985: 85(5): 647-661.

Neuman S B & Dwyer J. Developing vocabulary and conceptual knowledge for low-income preschoolers: A design experiment. Journal of Literacy Research. 2011: 43(2): 103-129.

Pellegrini AD & Galda L. The effects of thematic-fantasy play training on the development of children’s story comprehension. American Educational Research Journal. 1982: 19(3): 443-452.

Saville K. Strategies for using repetition as a powerful teaching tool. Music Educators Journal. 2011: 98(1): 69-75.

Schenck J. (2003, April 24-27). “Movement and Decision-Making in Memory” [Paper presentation]. Learning and the Brain Conference VIII, Cambridge, MA, United States.

Schickedanz JA. 2008. Increasing the power of instruction: Integration of language, literacy, and math across the preschool day. National Association for the Education of Young Children.

Trammell PT. 1977. An investigation of the effectiveness of repetition and guided listening in developing enjoyable music listening experiences for second grade

Trivette CM, Simkus A, Dunst CJ & Hamby DW. Repeated book reading and preschoolers’ early literacy development. Center for Early Literacy Learning. 2012:

Yaden D. Understanding stories through repeated read-alouds: How many does it take?. The Reading Teacher. 1988: 41(6): 556-560.

Repetition

Blank M & Frank SM. Story recall in kindergarten children: Effect of method of presentation on psycholinguistic performance. Child Development. 1971: 42: 299-312.

Bowman D. (2011, Dec 2). Read It Again, Sam. New York Times. https://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/04/books/review/read-it-again-sam.html?pagewanted=all

Brown AL. Recognition, reconstruction, and recall of narrative sequences by preoperational children. Child Development.1975: 46(1) :156-166.

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Ritual

Chvojicek R, Henthorne M & Larson N. 2001. Transition magician for families: Helping parents and children with everyday routines. Readleaf Press.

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A Fun, Positive Environment

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Play

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